What book(s) are you reading right now?

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The Beastie Boys book was a good read. While it wasn't a straight-forward exact telling of their history, more so a bunch of stories that tells about their rise and fame, it kept me reading every day.

Now moved on to Akira Kurosawa's Something Like an Autobiography.
It's a very enlightening look into the early part of his life and film career. It's great to read how he took negative aspects in his life and saw them as real learning lessons.
 
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I'm not reading anything now. I'm looking for an interesting book for me. The last book I read is Green King written by Paul Lou Sulitser. I really liked the book, it was written easily and interestingly. I don't want a spoiler, so if you are interested, then here is an official description of the book. I really like the main character of this book, but I never know what is in his head. I like the principles that guided this person. Although he has enough flaws. I don't like too perfect heroes. It's important for me that they are as close to real people as possible.
 

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For my commute to work, I listen to a lot of audio books, and I'm currently on Under the Dome by King. I'm about halfway through Queen's Shadow by EK Johnston, and it's really good! I'm no prequel lover, but I still rather stories in that era over the ST ones, and it is doing a great job showing the transition of Padme from queen to senator between episodes 1 and 2.
 

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Finished both, and Queen's Shadow was particularly good! I'm now halfway through I Heard You Paint Houses and am listening to Maul Lockdown on audio.
 
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I've been re-reading the Tripod Trilogy by John Christopher. I loved these books as a kid, and they hold up well as an adult reader.
 
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Finished Forever Changes: Arthur Lee And The Book of Love.
Great biography on musician Arthur Lee and his group Love from the 60s/70s (and later years but not as prominent.

Now reading Face It, the autobiography by Debbie Harry from the band Blondie. Just in the beginning of it. Has good moments so far and some that are like, ok why is that in the book, but overall working its way up to the eventual fame.
 
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Finished Debbie Harry's Face It. Really good autobiography.
She gives very vivid descriptions of New York during the 70s and 80s.
The stuff about her working up to be where she is now is really interesting. I'm glad she didn't take the route of, "oh I'm important, I'm a trendsetter or I was oppressed as a woman, etc." She really delves in to the nitty gritty of working at it.

Don't really have anything I'm really anxious to read next, so I'm finishing up a book of poetry by Charles Bukowski.
 
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I finished the Rise Of Skywalker novelization a week or so ago. It was good, well written. It wasn't so different from the movie to be frustrating in a "why did/didn't they do that" kind of way, but it was so in sync with the movie as to be boring.

Couple things I did pick up on that I didn't notice watching the movie
  Spoiler:  

They mention Chewie being 250 years old. I'm no mathematician, but I believe historically he's always been 200 in ANH. That'd make him 235 at best.
If the Blockade Runner in the movie is the Tantive IV, as they say in the novel... how did the Rebels get it back after Vader captured it? I sincerely do hope the explanation is a shrug and not "read this 4 part comic series."

The novel does explain the Jannah/Lando thing a bit better. Its not so much implying Lando is her father, but in the book it explains Lando had a daughter the first order took. So Jannah being someone who was taken by the FO, Lando is keen on the idea of helping her and others like her, find where they're from, find their families. Which is cool.

Couple qualms about the details they do go into:
I hate that they keep referring to the Faclon as Rey's ship. Chewie gave it Rey? Are you high? No, Chewie owns the Falcon. And if he were to give it to anyone it would be Leia.

At the end Poe says "General Leia united a whole galaxy. This time, it's for real." That line bugs me as well. I know I sound like an OT curmudgeon, but that's too... I don't know what. Like are we sure its for real this time? I thought it was pretty for real at the end of Jedi, but apparently not because we just basically did the whole thing again.

I dunno, story is still kind of a mess. But I do like it, lotta heart.

 
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Read Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar. Great read. The descent of the main character from one "life" to "the other" is just so well written. Some paragraphs and sentences are so beautifully written that I had to read some of them over and over.

Los Angeles Stories by Ry Cooder. A bunch of stories that are loosely connected in post-WWII era. Fairly decent read.

Now I'm struggling to read Star Wars: Ronin - A Visions Novel. Based on the Visions episode this one is taking a while to get though. Not sure I'll finish it.
 
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Thoroughly enjoyed LeCarre's "The Night Manager," even tracked down and watched the miniseries afterwards. The "exploitation versus enforcement" theme especially struck a nerve. I had read "The Russia House" and "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" years ago and they were okay, but a little dry for my [lack of] taste. Against my better judgment I recently grabbed some of his other works from the local used bookshop to burn some trade-in credit.

"The Little Drummer Girl" was a slog, but nothing compared to "Absolute Friends," which was downright bleak. I assumed "The Naive and Sentimental Lover" would be typical, but apparently LeCarre went through a romance novel phase in the early 70's. Only my downright pigheadedness made me finish these three. Granted, I'm probably somewhere on the spectrum and don't relate well to this kind of psycho-melodrama, but man - Give me a Sandford or Connelly novel any day.

Currently working through "The Constant Gardener" and it's moving a little faster. Planning to catch the movie after I've finished.
 
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I've been on a biography/memoirs phase right now...

Let Love Rule by Lenny Kravitz - really good memoir; he really had a lot of "advantages" but it was fun to read a lot of it.

A Perfect Union of Contrary Things - a biography of Maynard James Keenan of the band Tool. This one was a really good read. It really tells how he went from one obstacle or desire to another. A bit "pat myself on the back" at times, but overall a good read.

Pryor Convictions and other Sentences - an autobiography by Richard Pryor. VERY raw and curse-y just like you'd imagine. That man went through a lot!
 
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