Vintage: Should I store my figures in sandwich bags and Ziploc bags?

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I was thinking about this the other day, because all my carded figures are in Ziploc bags and my extra loose figures are wrapped up in sandwich bags. Is this bad? In other words, will the bubbles on my carded figs start to yellow and my loose figs start to yellow as well cuz of the bags I'm using? As you all know, I'm a poor, starving college kid and I can't afford any of those Star Cases to protect my stuff. Some day when I make some money though instead of having to give it all to my university!
Later!


[ 02-01-2002: Message edited by: flarida ]
 
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Hey, phreaky, I recently took all my loose vinties out of their bags and put them into inexpensive plastic tackle boxes. I found ones at Walmart with movable section dividers for $4 each which hold 12 - 18 figures each depending on their height. I don't know what kind of chemical reactions can occur with plastic baggies, (sealed figures in Mail-in Kenner baggies seem to have fared quite well) but the bags don't give figures any structural support in storage. At least with tackle boxes you know there is no pressure on them.
 
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by PodRacer X:
Hey, phreaky, I recently took all my loose vinties out of their bags and put them into inexpensive plastic tackle boxes. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It's important to remember that you are placing the plastic figures up against a dissimilar plastic. I wouldn't be surprised to see the figures react inside the tackle box.




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Dan W. Flarida
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You've got to go with archival material. StarCases are only around $1 these days or if you want, get mylar comic book bags and archival cardboard backing and slip them in there.

R. Jason Coulston
rjcoulston@home.com
 
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Hey PodRacer X, if it would make you feel any better I used a takle box for my figures from 1983-1994 (I stoped playing with them and started just collecting them at this time) and none of my figures faded, broke down, got sticky, etc. Still has minty as the day I got them, kept that vinty smell also. Now I not saying that "maybe" at sometime in the future the figures would have a reaction, but for 11 years they didn't. I store them now in acrylic cases for display purposes.
 
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Hey, Dan!

Would it be better if I put them in mylar bags, and stored those bags in the tackle boxes for support, or am I hosed?

There's got to be a good way to store these things. I thought I'd found one, but maybe not. Sheesh!
 
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No, what you need to do is get a magnetic display vaccum tube. The figure is suspended in mid air non touching anything.

:)

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Yeah, I'd love to get Star Cases and I know they're relatively cheap, but I have almost 100 vintage carded figs and almost that number of carded Episode I figs, so $1 a case could add up. I'll just keep them in the Ziploc and hope I can come up with some mad money soon. I'll see about putting the loose figs in the tackle boxes. Thanks for the info.! Later!


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Who's to say what plastics a tackle box is made out of. I think that could be different depending on the brand. Which could make all the difference in the world. Just because one person had no problems doesn't mean someone else won't. I'm no plastic's expert by any means but, I would be careful about such things.

Just a thought,

Jeff
 
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Lots of the figures I've had since I was a kid fared very well in my Darth Vader Case. Maybe I should put the hard to replace items back in it!

Thanks for the comments, folks. This is an area of research I know nothing about, and I appreciate the insight and experiences.
 
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I am a new member to your group, so I don't know what advice others have given you, but I know from years of collecting that this is an important issue - preserving your collection.

I recently put my loose figures in small baggies to protect them from damage when I moved my collection into my new house. When I unpacked I found that most of my figures had a layer of sweat on them. Perhaps it was the moisture in the air when I sealed the bag. I promptly removed all my figures and placed them back into my vinyl storage cases where they have been for the last few years. I check up on them periodically, and there hasn't been any damage to them. I like the vinyl storage cases because they do not rattle around as much as placing them in other storage cases, such as the Vader and 3PO bust cases. Which can cause the paint to wear off or chip when the fall down into the crease.

As far as the carded figures are concerned I would recommend that you purchase cases for them, especially the vintage carded figures. I know it's expensive I have quite a few vintage carded figures and they are all in protective cases. But they do protect them from the elements.

I had the opportunity to get a tour of Steve Sansweets collection with a few buddies of mine in 1991 and I asked him how to protect the carded figures from yellowing and he said that the cards will yellow over time. It is inevitable because of the oxygen surrounding the plastic. He said the I should keep the carded figures in a dark, smoke-free environment. I noticed that his vintage figures were just sitting in their display bins without Star Case protection, But the key was that they were out of the light and stored in a dry, dark room.

Good Luck!
Fluke
 
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Fluke Starbucker:

he said that the cards will yellow over time. It is inevitable because of the oxygen surrounding the plastic. He said the I should keep the carded figures in a dark, smoke-free environment.
Fluke
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm not a scientist so I can't comment with complete authority, but I believe yellowing bubbles have less to do with light and smoke than varied temperatures, heat, and moisture.

Cases of unopened POTF figures were found in an Australian warehouse some time ago (the reason for which so so many carded Yak Faces, Anakin Skywalkers, Gamorrean Guards, AT-AT Drivers, and Niktos have been made available). The majority of these figures have mild to severe yellowing, yet they were in dark and dry containers (Kenner shipping cases).

I believe Australia has a fairly hot and humid climate which would explain the yellowing.

Somebody please jump in and correct me if I'm a blathering idiot.

R. Jason Coulston
rjcoulston@home.com
 
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I've enjoyed reading these comments, storage is something I was wondering about too. Are loose vintage figures ok in ziplock/sandwich bags? I currently don't have any vintage on display, as I am waiting to build up my collection first....so the ones I do have are in individual "half sandwich" ziplock bags, then in a shoebox....what is the best way to store these? Thanks...

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Its hard to say. Some people have had an issue with the plastic in plastic bags reacting to loose figure plastic or to the card bubbles (if on card). I actually had my vintage figures from roughly 1978 to 2000 in a cardboard shoebox. I didn't notice any figure damage. Who knows, there are plenty of stories of people storing figs in plastic bags with no problems, tackle boxes no problem, shoe boxes no problem, etc. yet there are about as many horror stories related to the same storage techniques.

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How about a plastic fisthing tackle case lined with white felt to keep it away from plastic. Unless of course the felt might run or something.

This is a good topic for me as I have been pondering how to pack my collection since I found out I'm going to have to put them in storage for awhile.
 
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It would be safe to line the tackle box with plain paper, and then put the vintage carded figures in the tackle box. That's safe right? Or wrapped in aluminum foil? I don't think aluminum foil hurts the figures or cards or bubbles when in conctact with it. Just a thought.

And about loose figures. Anyone ever heard or seen any evidence that the 50 and 100 count baseball card cases cause bad reactions with loose vintage figures? The really nice thick hard little clear plastic cases that seal air tight? Those should be ok right? Mine have been in there for 5 years so far and no damage or fading or oxydation or gooeyness yet anyway.


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It has become more and more accepted over the last few years that it is humidity, temperature and moisture that cause yellow bubbles, not other environmental effects such as air pollution or light.

The potential future problems with storage are more undecided. Just because an item has lasted the last 20 years untroubled, doesnt mean it'll survive the next 20.

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I am doing a degree in physics and from what
I can ascertain one problem is oxidisation
(this is when monoatomic oxygen collides and
combines with the polymer of the styrene plastic).the problem is made worse by temperature (the Oxygen atoms are given more energy,thus speed up, causing more damage when they collide with plastic).
The second is Ultra violet light, UV is
of high energy in comparission to visable
light, this has the effect of breaking bonds
in the plastic, a similar effect to oxygen
atoms colliding with the plastic.
Acids from the card backs also cause similar
damage this of course cannot easily be stopped.
 
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So, in other words....I'm just in big trouble if I want to store loose figs for a long while.

 
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