Star Wars Screenplay Daily Reading

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Threepio would probably point out it's bad etiquette for the passengers to invade the cockpit uninvited, but Han and Chewie are definitely otherwise occupied. Still, Han and Luke continue to throw insults around, showing us there is no trust between them (yet...their relationship is one of the simple pleasures of the unfolding story.)
I suppose this 'uninvite' allows Han a little more exposition to show his skills once again particularly in front of Luke (and to the audience as well through Luke's POV). And it's sort of that last tension builder before that 'race' to Alderaan gets into full swing.
 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 71 -- 200 posts!

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EXT. SPACE - PLANET TATOOINE
Imperial cruisers fire at the pirateship.
We are deep into the "action sequence" here. The shots fly by fast, no pun intended.
 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 72

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INT. MILLENNIUM FALCON - COCKPIT
The ship shudders as an explosion flashes outside the window.

HAN
Here's where the fun begins!

BEN
How long before you can make the
jump to light speed?

HAN
It'll take a few moments to get the
coordinates from the navi-computer.

The ship begins to rock violently as lasers hit it.

LUKE
Are you kidding? At the rate they're
gaining...

HAN
Traveling through hyperspace isn't
like dusting crops, boy! Without
precise calculations we could fly
right through a star or bounce too
close to a supernova and that'd end
your trip real quick, wouldn't it?

The ship is now constantly battered with laserfire as a red
warning light begins to flash.

LUKE
What's that flashing?

HAN
We're losing our deflector shield.
Go strap yourself in, I'm going to
make the jump to light speed.

The galaxy brightens and they move faster, almost as if
crashing a barrier. Stars become streaks as the pirateship makes the jump to hyperspace.
Hey, imagine that--another iconic image: the Falcon jumping to lightspeed. "Stars become streaks" was a great visual and kinetic idea.

There was tremendous restraint in the exposition given here, and even then Harrison Ford couldn't stand even this much gobbledygook. I wonder if the scene could have just shown us Hyperspace jumping without even the little bit of explanation..?

As it is, West End Games took that one line and turned it into a propulsion system that makes sense. That work went on to become the bible for the Expanded Universe novels, and everything stayed pretty consistent for 30 plus years. So maybe that line should stay.
 
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Han's line to me illustrates the dangers of FTL travel, similar in rumination on comprehending why Federation starships in the Trek universe possess navigational deflectors and inertial dampeners. The time required for hyperspace calculations adds a bit more drama and a little suspense to the scene as well, as this could be viewed as one of the numerous obstacles to overcome on their journey to Alderaan.
 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 73 (better late than never!)

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EXT. SPACE
The Millennium Falcon zooms into infinity in less than a second.
This is great too, yet so subtle...you get the experience of the pilot's POV as far as entering hyperspace, then this next shot--taken from a third-person perspective--reinforces what that visual of the streaking stars actually means as far as travel and velocity. This is what I meant about the line being almost unnecessary. The visuals do such a good job of showing us this thing we have never actually experienced in our lives, and make it flow so organically that we intuitively understand it.

And yes, all in service to the story. The droids have just barely escaped Vader's snare on Tatooine. Onward, to the safety of planet Alderaan!
 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 74

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EXT. DEATH STAR

Alderaan looms behind the Death Star battlestation.
The transition is okay. It is unfortunately a shot of space switching to another shot of space, but this one has two large objects to look at. We don't know Alderaan is Alderaan yet, but we know that was the destination mentioned earlier so we can guess (we won't have to for long.)
 
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The transition is okay. It is unfortunately a shot of space switching to another shot of space, but this one has two large objects to look at.
We had a nearly identical shot, but this time involving a stolen Imperial shuttle, another Death Star and a Forest Moon. ;) Between those scenes was a screen wipe, but in this case it might have been slightly awkward since the audience is expecting 'something terrible' about to happen.
 
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INT. DEATH STAR - CONTROL ROOM
Admiral Motti enters the quiet control room and bows before
Governor Tarkin, who stands before the huge wall screen
displaying a small green planet.

MOTTI
We've entered the Alderaan system.

Vader and two stormtroopers enter with Princess Leia. Her
hands are bound.

LEIA
Governor Tarkin, I should have
expected to find you holding Vader's
leash. I recognized your foul stench
when I was brought on board.

TARKIN
Charming to the last. You don't know
how hard I found it signing the order
to terminate your life!

LEIA
I surprised you had the courage to
take the responsibility yourself!

TARKIN
Princess Leia, before your execution
I would like you to be my guest at a
ceremony that will make this battle
station operational. No star system
will dare oppose the Emperor now.

LEIA
The more you tighten your grip,
Tarkin, the more star systems will
slip through your fingers.

TARKIN
Not after we demonstrate the power
of this station. In a way, you have
determined the choice of the planet
that'll be destroyed first. Since
you are reluctant to provide us with
the location of the Rebel base, I
have chosen to test this station's
destructive power... on your home
planet of Alderaan.

LEIA
No! Alderaan is peaceful. We have no
weapons. You can't possibly...

TARKIN
You would prefer another target? A
military target? Then name the system!

Tarkin waves menacingly toward Leia.

TARKIN
I grow tired of asking this. So it'll
be the last time. Where is the Rebel
base?

Leia overhears an intercom voice announcing the approach to
Alderaan.

LEIA
(softly)
Dantooine.

Leia lowers her head.

LEIA
They're on Dantooine.

TARKIN
There. You see Lord Vader, she can
be reasonable.
(addressing Motti)
Continue with the operation. You may
fire when ready.

LEIA
What?

TARKIN
You're far too trusting. Dantooine
is too remote to make an effective
demonstration. But don't worry. We
will deal with your Rebel friends
soon enough.

LEIA
No!
This scene is a pretty rare thing in the film: a dramatic bit that relies on acting to be successful. And it works. The words don't pop off the page, in point of fact they're kind of clunky to read, but they were given great life by Cushing and Fisher. The commitment was there, and once again the movie gets the boost of this unlikely realism in a fantastical situation.
 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 75

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INT. DEATH STAR - BLAST CHAMBER

VADER
Commence primary ignition.

A button is pressed which switches on a panel of lights. A
hooded Imperial soldier reaches overhead and pulls a lever.
Another lever is pulled. Vader reaches for still another
lever and a bank of lights on a panel and wall light up. A
huge beam of light emanates from within a cone-shaped area
and converges into a single laser beam out toward Alderaan.
The small green planet of Alderaan is blown into space dust.
So obviously the script differs from the film with the level of Vader's involvement in the superlaser activation. The next time I hear the generic Imperial announce "Commence primary ignition" I will replay it in my head as Vader's line.

This is one of those "defying expectations" done right. Our heroes didn't even have a chance to save the day. The Empire is allowed to have its teeth, and we see the destruction of a world and millions of people. The bad guys won this round, and not in a kiddie, consequence-less way.

I appreciate the subtle menace here even more: Alderaan might as well be Earth from the looks of it. So the bad guys might as well be blowing us up. This totally reinforces the evil alignment of the Empire. "And you call yourselves human" indeed.
 
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I couldn't help but to notice the 'hooded Imperial soldier/pulls a lever' bit implying an executioner/guillotine motif being described here, a somewhat familiar yet foreboding kind of imagery being related to the audience here on the part of Lucas. And it also seems Lucas intended Vader to get a little involved here, but I think Vader 'taking a step' back in the final cut works for me, in the sense that Vader's original tasking of securing the plans is still in progress while allowing Tarkin his own little exposition of showing how 'human(less)' he could possibly be.

And I ever get a chance to run into Mr. Jones, I'll definitely kindly ask him to say that 'foreboding' line on my smartphone to get a true sense of how the scene would've played out in this version. :D

P.S. 6919 posts(!).....I know I skipped commenting on the last reading, but what did I miss?! ;)

 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 76

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Today I am going to do it a little bit differently, and break the next scene up into chunks. Trying to dissect the whole scene in one post would fail to do it justice.

And so Part I...

INT. MILLENNIUM FALCON - CENTRAL HOLD AREA
Ben watches Luke practice the lightsaber with a small "seeker"
robot. Ben suddenly turns away and sits down. He falters,
seems almost faint.

LUKE
Are you all right? What's wrong?

BEN
I felt a great disturbance in the
Force... as if millions of voices
suddenly cried out in terror and
were suddenly silenced. I fear
something terrible has happened.

Ben rubs his forehead. He seems to drift into a trance. Then
he fixes his gaze on Luke.

BEN
You'd better get on with your
exercises.
This is an important transition because it fixes the time frame between the two viewpoints (even moreso because these guys are blasting through an interdimensional reality moving faster than light, yet we see time is still moving the same story-wise.) It is also the first time we see the Force act upon a character rather than vice-versa. Ben will tell us more about that in a little bit.
 
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Disclaimer....now I realize this thought can be a somewhat divisive issue, particularly on the ones I've personally expressed in the movie threads, but I feel it's a poignant, but a rather important form of perspective in the movie's (let alone the entire franchise's) thematic analysis.

On a rather sensitive and somewhat somber annotation, we are periodically reminded on the inspirations that went into Star Wars during the real time events occurring at the time.....government oppression/corruption, social/political injustices leading up to the thematic exposition of mass genocide in this and the preceding scene. Lucas' invention of the Force and its ability to be 'disturbed' provides the audience with a sense that there is also a potential outcry to the thought of such events up to an almost God-like level (if I may be permitted to term that aptly).
 
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Disclaimer....now I realize this thought can be a somewhat divisive issue, particularly on the ones I've personally expressed in the movie threads, but I feel it's a poignant, but a rather important form of perspective in the movie's (let alone the entire franchise's) thematic analysis.

On a rather sensitive and somewhat somber annotation, we are periodically reminded on the inspirations that went into Star Wars during the real time events occurring at the time.....government oppression/corruption, social/political injustices leading up to the thematic exposition of mass genocide in this and the preceding scene. Lucas' invention of the Force and its ability to be 'disturbed' provides the audience with a sense that there is also a potential outcry to the thought of such events up to an almost God-like level (if I may be permitted to term that aptly).
Good points. I believe this is what Qui-Gon meant by the living Force. In hindsight, it is a lesson Obi-Wan learned well from his former Master.

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I read that line differently.

consider a spider in her web awaiting the arrival of a housefly. The Web is calm and still. until the fly arrives and "disturbs" the web.
the spider feels a "Great Disturbance" in her web. the Web Itself does not feel moral outrage on a god-like level. it just transmits kinetic energy to the spider.

and/or

consider a calm still body of water with no ripples, in a perfect state of "balance", the surface is as smooth as glass.
now you "disturb" the surface by throwing a large boulder into the lake.
the once-calm surface of the water churns and ripples.. and IF that boulder is large enough.. it can actually cause a "tidal wave" at the shore.
the lake does not feel moral outrage on a god-like level. it simply transmits kinetic energy to the shore.

obi-wan's comment about a 'disturbance' in the force, does not imply that the force is sentient.
this doesn't happen until qui-gon mentions the "Will Of The Force" (in contrast to the Will of the Council - which were two different things).

(( he was talking about the Council forbidding him from teaching Anakin -- aka: "will of the force" vs "will of the council" -- aka: separation of church and state, the central theme of the PT, and the reason for the Jedi Downfall -- they were not heeding the will of the force they were only heeding the will of the senate)).

--> the idea that the force is a sentient being, capable of 'moral outrage', was only introduced with the words "will of the force" -- this is not inferred from the words "disturbance in the force" (which really just describes a spider's web to "bind the galaxy together") -- at this early point in the story, I don't think GL was thinking that far ahead.
 
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A worthy discussion onto itself, so before we move on, I'll simply share a few links (some of which may have been discussed before) for some light (and dark side) reading: :D(Apologies in advance if I seem a bit inflated)


https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/112721/is-the-force-sentient

https://www.reddit.com/r/StarWars/comments/2mf3dp/lets_have_a_debate_is_the_force_sentient/

https://www.quora.com/Is-the-Force-sentient

Also, a transcript from the George Lucas/Bill Moyers interview (and an excerpt below relating to the topic at hand):

https://billmoyers.com/content/mythology-of-star-wars-george-lucas/

Excerpt:

BILL MOYERS: And where does God fit in this concept of the universe? In this cosmos that you’ve created? Is the Force God?
GEORGE LUCAS: I put the Force into the movies in order to try to awaken a certain kind of spirituality in young people. More a belief in God than a belief in any particular, you know, religious system. I mean, the — the — the — the real question is to ask the question, because if you — if you — having enough interest in the mysteries of life to ask the questions, is — is there a God or is there not a God?, that’s — that’s, for me, the worst thing that can happen. You know, if you asked a young person, ‘Is there a God?’ and they say, ‘I don’t know. ‘ You know? I think you should have an opinion about that.
BILL MOYERS: Do you have an opinion, or are you looking?
GEORGE LUCAS: Well, I think there is a God. No question. What that God is, or what we know about that God I’m not sure. The one thing I know about life and about the — the nature of the human race is that it — the human race has always believed it’s known everything. Even the cavemen thought they had it all figured out and they knew everything there was to know about everything. Because that’s what — that’s where mythology came from. You know, it’s constructing some kind of — of — of context for the unknown. So we figured it all out and it was fine. I would say that, you know, cavemen had, you know, on a scale — and understood about one, you know? Now we’ve made it up to about five. The only thing that most people don’t realize is the scale goes to a million.

While this might sound a little vague, the underline response says to me that this sort of defines the lifelong pursuit of the Jedi Order in trying to understand the mysteries of the Force on how the Force reacts to them. And in doing so, attempting to find possible answers as to whether the Force itself has a purpose (i.e. God's plan?). o-o



 
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I like the discussion. I found that, while watching "Phantom Menace," I agreed with just about everything Qui-Gon had to say about "The Living Force." That's what this seems to be about, and it does seem separate from the Bogan and Ashla (to use GL's 1970s names for them.) That would be a huge hit to the midichlorian population, something Obi-Wan (en route to the location so local in some extent) would detect. And if he draws power from the field of energy created by the Force of Others, he would be winded with a decrease, followed by saddened for recognizing what it was.

But anyway, here comes Han Solo...

Han Solo enters the room.
HAN
Well, you can forget your troubles
with those Imperial slugs. I told
you I'd outrun 'em.

Luke is once again practicing with the lightsaber.

HAN
Don't everyone thank me at once.

Threepio watches Chewbacca and Artoo who are engrossed in a
game in which three-dimensional holographic figures move
along a chess-type board.

HAN
Anyway, we should be at Alderaan about oh-two-hundred hours.
I do enjoy the joke of the inversion here caused by the addition of the final line in the Han and Jabba scene in the Special Edition, where he calls Jabba a "wonderful human being" while the Imperials become "slugs."

Military time quote...its pretty meaningless, but if Tatooine was "morning" and we are still on the same clock, this flight has been more than 14 hours.
 
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Military time quote...its pretty meaningless, but if Tatooine was "morning" and we are still on the same clock, this flight has been more than 14 hours.
'Meaningless' science lesson here. On the galactic scale that the Star Wars universe entails, it would be sensical to adopt some universal time constant. So assuming for example hydrogen (or whatever it's called in their universe) has the same properties as in ours and is just as abundant, the hyperfine transition period of hydrogen (say that 3 times) could be adopted just the same as a base unit.


This time constant, in real life, aided scientists Carl Sagan and Frank Drake to develop the pulsar map that was etched on the golden disks aboard the Voyager spacecrafts, when in such time any advanced alien encounters would allow them to calculate the Sun's (and Earth's) location based on the precise time-keeping spin of known pulsars in our galaxy. Below is a link to wet your intellectual prowess...(time constant annotation about half-way down the page). :D

http://www.pbs.org/the-farthest/science/pulsar-map/

 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 78

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Midichlorians get a bum rap IMHO. They are exactly like mitochondria. In less than thirty years we are going to be able to introduce all sorts of microbial structures into our bodies that will give up what we'd call "superpowers." If we want to be ironic we can even call them midichlorians when they come around.

But I digress. Chess, anyone?

Chewbacca and the two robots sit around the lighted table covered with small holographic monsters. Each side of the
table has a small computer monitor embedded in it. Chewbacca
seems very pleased with himself as he rests his lanky fur-
covered arms over his head.

THREEPIO
Now be careful, Artoo.

Artoo immediately reaches up and taps the computer with his
stubby claw hand, causing one of the holographic creatures
to walk to the new square. A sudden frown crosses Chewbacca's
face and he begins yelling gibberish at the tiny robot.
Threepio intercedes on behalf of his small companion and
begins to argue with the huge Wookiee.

THREEPIO
He made a fair move. Screaming about
it won't help you.

HAN
(interrupting)
Let him have it. It's not wise to
upset a Wookiee.

THREEPIO
But sir, nobody worries about
upsetting a droid.

HAN
That's 'cause droids don't pull
people's arms out of their socket
when they lose. Wookiees are known
to do that.

THREEPIO
I see your point, sir. I suggest a
new strategy, Artoo. Let the Wookiee win.
This section of this scene was script-doctored by Hyuck and Katz. It's perfect because it brings such a human activity to our least human characters, and helps the audience see them as not so different after all.

(Threepio's joke here is great, and they resisted the great temptation of using it as a "button." And I, after all of my condemnation thus far, turned it into one.)
 
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This section of this scene was script-doctored by Hyuck and Katz. It's perfect because it brings such a human activity to our least human characters, and helps the audience see them as not so different after all.
As a 4 year old in 1977, I never doubted 3PO and R2 were as real of individuals as Luke or Han. That's high praise to Lucas, Daniels, Purvis and the other behind the scenes individuals that brought the droids to life.

Chewie took a little late longer for this 4-year old to warm up to as he weirded me out just enough to unsettle me. I understood he was a hero character by the movies end but didn't grasp his relationship with Han. Was he like a dog, or some sort of tamed Sasquatch? Subsequent early EU materials (like the Holiday Special!) And the Marvel Comic issues helped round Chewy out for me.





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Besides Chewie's piloting skills, his knowledge of even a strategic game of space chess adds a bit of dimension/complexity to his character.....which BTW begins at herding away from Lucas' original concept of 'primitive' societies of Wookiees pushing the anti-technological themes central to Lucas' core beliefs. Yup, Ewoks were only a mere 5-6 years away! :D
 
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A complete aside here; my wife was talking about mitochondria and misspoke organelles with organisms as something creating energy.
So I asked her if she meant midichlorians.
that's actually pretty funny/ like a nerd-joke on the Simpsons that only Lisa understands :p

(and/or an easy mistake for your wife to make, since our mitochondria has its own genetic code -- your mitochondrial DNA is different from nuclear DNA so it'skind of like a separate alien 'life form' :p even though it technically falls short of the scientific definition of 'organism').

either way, we can see where GL got the idea. it's a common misunderstanding that the mitochondria are separate life forms (based on the notion of 'mitochondrial DNA'); this was a sci-fi subplot waiting to happen.

on Star Trek.

*rimshot*

:p
 
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Besides Chewie's piloting skills, his knowledge of even a strategic game of space chess adds a bit of dimension/complexity to his character.....which BTW begins at herding away from Lucas' original concept of 'primitive' societies of Wookiees pushing the anti-technological themes central to Lucas' core beliefs. Yup, Ewoks were only a mere 5-6 years away! :D
I see that in a different way. I see Chewie not necessarily good at strategy but willing to use brute Force to get a victory
 
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Luke stands in the middle of the small hold area; he seems frozen in place. A humming lightsaber is held high over his
head. Ben watches him from the corner, studying his movements.
Han watches with a bit of smugness.

BEN
Remember, a Jedi can feel the Force
flowing through him.

LUKE
You mean it controls your actions?

BEN
Partially. But it also obeys your
commands.

Suspended at eye level, about ten feet in front of Luke, a
"seeker", a chrome baseball-like robot covered with antennae,
hovers slowly in a wide arc. The ball floats to one side of
the youth then the other. Suddenly it makes a lightning-swift
lunge and stops within a few feet of Luke's face. Luke doesn't
move and the ball backs off. It slowly moves behind the boy,
then makes another quick lunge, this time emitting a blood
red laser beam as it attacks. It hits Luke in the leg causing
him to tumble over. Han lets loose with a burst of laughter.

HAN
Hokey religions and ancient weapons
are no match for a good blaster at
your side, kid.

LUKE
You don't believe in the Force, do
you?

HAN
Kid, I've flown from one side of
this galaxy to the other. I've seen
a lot of strange stuff, but I've
never seen anything to make me believe
there's one all-powerful force
controlling everything. There's no
mystical energy field that controls
my destiny.

Ben smiles quietly.

HAN
It's all a lot of simple tricks and
nonsense.

BEN
I suggest you try it again, Luke.

Ben places a large helmet on Luke's head which covers his
eyes.

BEN
This time, let go your conscious
self and act on instinct.

LUKE
(laughing)
With the blast shield down, I can't
even see. How am I supposed to fight?

BEN
Your eyes can deceive you. Don't
trust them.

Han skeptically shakes his head as Ben throws the seeker
into the air. The ball shoots straight up in the air, then
drops like a rock. Luke swings the lightsaber around blindly
missing the seeker, which fires off a laserbolt which hits
Luke square on the seat of the pants. He lets out a painful
yell and attempts to hit the seeker.

BEN
Stretch out with your feelings.

Luke stands in one place, seemingly frozen. The seeker makes
a dive at Luke and, incredibly, he managed to deflect the
bolt. The ball ceases fire and moves back to its original
position.

BEN
You see, you can do it.

HAN
I call it luck.

BEN
In my experience, there's no such
thing as luck.

HAN
Look, going good against remotes is
one thing. Going good against the
living? That's something else.

Solo notices a small light flashing on the far side of the
control panel.

HAN
Looks like we're coming up on
Alderaan.

Han and Chewbacca head back to the cockpit.

LUKE
You know, I did feel something. I
could almost see the remote.

BEN
That's good. You have taken your
first step into a larger world.
This is it for Luke's training this episode. But the simple lesson is nuanced enough that several aspects of the "religion" of the Jedi can be gleaned from it. And all in a "show, don't tell" way (I mean, Ben is literally training Luke here, of course the audience is going to hear him talk about the Force. But the context is there, it's not exposition.)

Likewise, we get to build out Han Solo's worldview as it contrasts with Ben Kenobi's. I have always really been struck by Ben's line "In my experience, there's no such thing as luck." It is a philosophy that has rung true too many times in my life to be discounted.

(Sidenote: I always thought the seeker ball was Han's and Ben was just using it, much like the blast helmet. But it has been regularly depicted in other media as being Ben's own. Where do you stand?)
 
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BEN
This time, let go your conscious
self and act on instinct.


This line stands out to me the most. 'Conscious self' will typically allow for a hint of doubt, a lesson Luke more so fully learns on Dagobah from Yoda involving an X-wing. 'Instinct' will typically involve faith, but it shouldn't be confused with 'being lucky' which implies events unfolding beyond one's control. As Ben noted, the Force also listens and responds.

As for the seeker, in context, it is an technological version of the classic mook jung or Wing Chun dummy (not to confused with Wang Chung, mind you) training aids used in martial arts, so I tend to side towards Obi-Wan based on that. And yes, Paul Atreides had his version too.
:grin:
 
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the seeker ball is a tough one. I prefer to think of it as it was something he found on the Falcon and he improvised this training. Makes it more unique which is why i hated in the Prequels all the young jedi were doing it.
 

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I always thought it was Ben's. He had planned to train Luke at some point so he would have the needed tools.
The ESB novel confirms that they were Jedi Training devices. There was a scene where Luke easily bested the remote and told Yoda. Then 3 or more remotes rose in the air behind Yoda.
(I remembered this so vividly that I was surprised that it was "cut" from the Special Edition. It was a Mandela effect.)
 
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"let go your conscious self" means "follow the will of the force"

-===-

the ability to use the force is a metaphor for freewill -- (man's ability to effect change in the universe around him by virtue of his own choices) -- in 1977, GL called this 'the Power of Man'

ie: SW is a classic "morality" play -- now that you have this thing called 'freewill' then what are you going to use it for? good or evil?

GL presents 3 paths to follow (not just 2):

1) the jedi Order - follow the Will of the People, at all costs -- the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few (aka: selflessness) -- let the Senate guide your actions.
2) the Sith path - follow the will of the individual -- the needs of YOURSELF outweigh the needs of the Many (aka: selfishness) -- let your Self decide your actions.
3) the Religious Path - follow the will of the entity who gave you 'freewill' in the first place. aka the will of god. (aka: the Will of the Force) -- let the Force guide your actions.

in the end, qui-gon's character represents the "correct" path (because this character is rewarded with "immortality" by the Religious Path).
he lets go of his "conscious self" , and he follows the will of the force. (like a christian might follow the will of god).

by contrast: the Order takes its moral code from the Senate (at all costs, even galactic war); the Sith do whatever is right for THEMSELVES.
but qui-gon uses the Force ITSELF as the wellspring-source of his own Morality. (he uses the force as 'Religion'). he lets the Force guide his actions.
 
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Interesting that these scenarios are put forth in such 'logical' terms :)D) considering Star Trek IV is an attempt of 'reconciling' the reasoning behind Spock and Kirk's actions in Trek's II and III respectively. In the end though, there really is no 'great divide' between logic and 'being human' since our capacity is process logic is what makes us human, and our ability to make valued judgements. The following links explain this is further detail:

As noted earlier, the Jedi devote their lifetime in pursuit of understanding the mysteries of the Force and as much achieve a form of 'immortality' (out of this kind of reconciliation) which has the potential of being passed on to the 'crude matter' world to those who have potential of attaining the same kind of status (Obi-Wan, Yoda and Luke).

 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 80

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As I've stated numerous times, I stand squarely in the "Living Force" camp with Qui-Gon.

INT. DEATH STAR - CONFERENCE ROOM
Imperial Officer Cass stands before Governor Tarkin and the
evil Dark Lord Darth Vader.

TARKIN
Yes.

OFFICER CASS
Our scout ships have reached
Dantooine. They found the remains of
a Rebel base, but they estimate that
it has been deserted for some time.
They are now conducting an extensive
search of the surrounding systems.

TARKIN
She lied! She lied to us!

VADER
I told you she would never consciously
betray the Rebellion.

TARKIN Terminate her... immediately!
I like that the Imperial Officer named here seems to be named after the Mamas and the Papas.

The script kind of shows its hand with this scene...I might have liked it to show up a little later, but the two Millennium Falcon scenes that bookend it needed something between them, so here we are. With Tarkin's order putting Leia's life in danger, and the heroes about to arrive on the scene, the diligent viewer can begin to put together how the adventure story might play out. It's too bad, because the destruction of Alderaan left things looking bleak and it would have been nice to keep that tension up for a bit longer, rather than this turn of events (which ought to raise the stakes, but to my eye don't.)
 
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Considering the events of Rogue One now, Tarkin would have put himself in somewhat of a pickle had Palpatine not disbanded the Senate at that time. Since he didn't want the total destruction of Jedha city to develop into a manifesto for the Empire, he would have to had to explain Alderaan's total destruction so as to not sway the Senate's sympathy towards the Rebellion.
 
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I like to think that the events of "Rogue One" can be seen as the reason the Senate was finally disbanded. Not just the successful rebel attack, but also the successful Death Star test fires. From the make-up of the Rebel Council scene, many of the key Alliance leaders were organizing in the back hallways of the Imperial Senate anyway; Palpatine is sending them off Coruscant/Imperial Center to their home systems to keep them separated and to be able to deal with insurgents on a case-by-case basis (as Senator Organa just learned.)

Some supplemental material (I think the radio drama?) pushed the idea that Tarkin was poised to depose the Emperor now that he was in command of the Death Star. I wonder what Vader would do in that event?

I'd like to posit a theory I'll call Krennic's Law: If you build a space station that can blow up planets, you can't consider yourself in charge of it if you are on a planet.:sneaky:

(And you'll notice by the time Death Star II came around, Palpatine took up residence there.)
 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 81

8007 Views. (Sorry for the lapsed days there, folks...busy busy busy!)

EXT. HYPERSPACE
The pirateship is just coming out of hyperspace; a strange
surreal light show surrounds the ship.
The distinction between "lightspeed" and "hyperspace" is never mentioned overtly. One "goes to lightspeed" to "jump into hyperspace." This is important enough because even schoolkids are taught that lightspeed would be an achingly slow rate to cross the galaxy. Hyperspace is just fictional enough that it can be used to fudge the timescale to whatever you need.

And though its made up and completely undefined, you get a sense that there is a rule system in place.
 
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8007 Views. (Sorry for the lapsed days there, folks...busy busy busy!)



The distinction between "lightspeed" and "hyperspace" is never mentioned overtly. One "goes to lightspeed" to "jump into hyperspace." This is important enough because even schoolkids are taught that lightspeed would be an achingly slow rate to cross the galaxy. Hyperspace is just fictional enough that it can be used to fudge the timescale to whatever you need.

And though its made up and completely undefined, you get a sense that there is a rule system in place.
i believe the offiical reason is you have to go to the speed of light then you enter another dimension ie hyperspace.

In Hyperspace you can move through other objects that are in real space ie other ships and all that but if you get to close to something that has a lot of gravity it will pull you out. Hence the line fly through a star and what not.
 
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i believe the offiical reason is you have to go to the speed of light then you enter another dimension ie hyperspace.

In Hyperspace you can move through other objects that are in real space ie other ships and all that but if you get to close to something that has a lot of gravity it will pull you out. Hence the line fly through a star and what not.
Meh, I'd probably concur with half of that. It's all fictional so your not wrong either.

Objects in realspace have a mass shadow in hyperspace. So you can't fly through anything, thus the need for safely plotted hyperspace routes and navicomputers or droids to make the jump calculations.

Lightspeed and Hyperspace are used almost interchangeably in SW. "Making the jump to Lightspeed". Doesn't really make real world sense as you physically cannot get there without expending infinite energy! But this is fiction, so maybe they just mean effectively jumping beyond normal-space into a inter-dimension not constrained by normal Einsteinian relativity.
 
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I personally never took 'lightspeed' as exactly meaning '1c' in the context of SW dialogue. To consistently regard Star Wars as 'space fantasy' rather than 'science-fiction' for me sort of helps with that sort of perspective. In my view, it could have been just a moniker for traveling at speeds anywhere beyond '1c' compared to realspace but in the realm of hyperspace to avoid any scientific conflict. In addition, it's likely a term adopted by almost every species in the galaxy capable of that level of technology, better sounding than 'ludicrous speed' but frankly just as apt. :p


Even in the world of Star Wars, ships like that would still have to contend with their version of 'subspace fields' in order to possibly decrease their inertial mass when accelerating to '1c'. Same thing with 'inertial dampeners' to create a counter-field against the inertia at even high sublight speeds to avoid the ship occupants of getting turn into chunky salsa (as Mike Okuda/Rick Sternbach) like to put it. :D Plus, realspace (and possibly hyperspace) isn't entirely a vacuum, there's typically a particle of hydrogen or atom for every 10 cubic cm of space on the average, assuming it's the same distribution in the SW universe.....so in retrospect, ships like the Falcon would need their version of 'navigational deflectors/screens' from getting turned into Swiss cheese in either realm.

On the side, if you ever get a chance to watch Carl Sagan's Cosmos, episode "Travels In Space and Time", there's a segment showing blueprints for actual starships drafted by Star Trek's own Rick Sternbach, inspired by ideas from the British Interplanetary Society. One of those ships, codenamed 'Project Orion', carried over as one of the propulsion principles onto the Messiah spacecraft in the movie 'Deep Impact' using nuclear detonation against a pusher plate to provide the acceleration.
 
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Star Wars Daily Screenplay Reading -- DAY 82

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My theory on the world of Star Wars and it's technology has long been that none of this stuff is new or innovative at all. the Galactic Republic, thousands of generations old as it is, is probably a third or fourth generation galactic society itself. Their use of the term "Lightspeed" is probably analogous to our use of "horsepower:" it has nothing to do with horses anymore, but was an apt comparison generations ago.

INT. MILLENNIUM FALCON - COCKPIT
HAN
Stand by, Chewie, here we go. Cut in
the sublight engines.

Han pulls back on a control lever. Outside the cockpit window
stars begin streaking past, seem to decrease in speed, then
stop. Suddenly the starship begins to shudder and violently
shake about. Asteroids begin to race toward them, battering
the sides of the ship.

HAN
What the...? Aw, we've come out of
hyperspace into a meteor shower.
Some kind of asteroid collision.
It's not on any of the charts.

The Wookiee flips off several controls and seems very cool
in the emergency. Luke makes his way into the bouncing
cockpit.

LUKE
What's going on?

HAN
Our position is correct, except...
no, Alderaan!

LUKE
What do you mean? Where is it?

HAN
Thats what I'm trying to tell you,
kid. It ain't there. It's been totally
blown away.

LUKE
What? How?

Ben moves into the cockpit behind Luke as the ship begins to
settle down.

BEN
Destroyed... by the Empire!

HAN
The entire starfleet couldn't destroy
the whole planet. It'd take a thousand
ships with more fire power than
I've...

A signal starts flashing on the control panel and a muffled
alarm starts humming.

HAN
There's another ship coming in.

LUKE
Maybe they know what happened.

BEN
It's an Imperial fighter.

Chewbacca barks his concern. A huge explosion bursts outside
the cockpit window, shaking the ship violently. A tiny, finned
Imperial TIE fighter races past the cockpit window.

LUKE
It followed us!

BEN
No. It's a short range fighter.

HAN
There aren't any bases around here.
Where did it come from?
You have to give Han a little credit here, he makes the logical leap from "asteroid collision" to "the shards of Alderaan" in the blink of an eye and without any sign given to the viewer. Of course we can make that connection easy enough after having seen the planet obliterated before our eyes. And yet, when Ben agrees it has been destroyed, Han backpedals and says it's impossible. Maybe we've found a little bit of sloppy writing, it's kind of amazing to stumble on something that could use a little more polish in here, usually it's all "iconic" this and "groundbreaking" that.

And though we've seen TIE fighters mentioned in the script previously this is our first physical description of one, calling out its small size and fins. My guess would be the other shots were inserted later in the writing, and this was the first mention in the script as it was being written.
 
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Maybe we've found a little bit of sloppy writing,
In technical terms, it's a 'meteor' when it enters an atmosphere. Before that, it's termed as a 'meteoroid'. But since Han mentions 'asteroid' immediately after, the two words (meteoroid-asteroid) spoken almost back-to-back might sound a bit awkward. Maybe Lucas knew this,....who knows, but I REALLY doubt the Han took the Falcon that close to Alderaan's atmosphere for the term to be correct. o-o​
 
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as far as the world building goes this is a very important scene as it shows the size and power of the Empire. Now in the old EU they kept increasing the size and strength of the empire.

For example it got the point where the empire was millions of star destroyers and each star destroyer could pretty much destroy a planet on their own.

But here we see they dont' even have a thousand ships let alone that kind of firepower.
 
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