Jabba's Sail Barge

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It's just stuff. It's a big plastic tube with sails. It's only worth as much as someone is willing to pay for it.

Expecting Hasbro to not rerelease it is like Hasbro expecting you to never sell it but if you do to only ever sell it at cost. It goes both ways.

If you have one be happy you were fortunate enough to have $600 + to spend on it. Even if it were to get rereleased it would be very limited and would likely be online only.

Sent from my SM-G973W using Tapatalk
 
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Don't spend more than you think it's worth to look at in your living room, if the bottom drops out from that hypothetical warehouse find. Then it's not a problem. The world is full of sad boxes of Beanie Babies and Superman Vol 2, # 75, from people who failed to heed this.
 
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I totally respect and understand your points, SWSF Eidolon. I didn't intend to mischaracterize or imply selfishness either. It is indeed annoying when the final product doesn't always quite match what was previewed. I've learned there can be some variation between a previewed design and the final piece so I guess it was easier for me to forgive them for the different paint scheme considering the rest of it was still pretty cool. As for the sanctity of ownership, that's something that I have a harder time relating to. I totally understand what you mean, though, and the value of a rare but highly desired collectible. It's like buying a piece of real estate to sit on and let appreciate and sell for a profit down the road. I get it. Toys can become valuable collectibles and some people may be in it just for the investment or maybe both, but because it's not an investment area for me, my bias leans toward spreading the joy, as opposed to preserving limited ownership. Either way you lean, someone loses, I suppose.

Incidentally, some things I've owned but didn't want anymore happened to have risen in value before I sold them and so I made a buck, but if I hadn't made anything, it wouldn't have made much difference to me. I also understand one's ire if a company was deliberately deceitful and said, hey this item is a limited piece and only x number will be made, in an attempt to boost sales and then turned around and said, just kidding, we're making more. That would lose my respect, but if a company realized, hey, the demand is bigger than we estimated. A lot of people want this and we can make this happen, so why not. I'm okay with that. Granted, I don't know Hasbro's motivations but whether the barge was going to get released again wouldn't have had any effect of my getting one. This reminds me of another controversial subject--scalping. Yes, people look for opportunities and they're good at reading the market. They buy a bunch of stuff for the sole purpose of reselling for a profit. Okay, I get it. It's a risk on the scalper's part, because maybe nobody will buy the stuff at an increased value and he has to sell it at a loss. But maybe he makes a profit, a big profit. Okay, I'm not demonizing him, but if I have to support one side over the other, I ultimately side more with the guy who just wants to get that cool collectible because it's a childhood dream, something he'll thoroughly enjoy and cherish, and less with the investor because well...it's just money.
 
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I like your ideas on what made Star Wars popular again in the 1990s.

All you guys are wrong. Great guesses, but you all miss the #1 reason for the Star Wars resurgence in the 1990s.

More than Zahn's "Heir to the Empire?" I hands down attribute the resurgence of SW to that series.
That was popular... Very very popular. And it kicked off the huge popularity of Star Wars in publishing and the further adventures of the Original Trilogy heroes. But the popularity in publishing happened because of something else before it.

Decipher. Perhaps the most important milestone in Star Wars’ resurgence as an epic fantasy entity.
That was cool the way every little shred of Star Wars was broken down, documented and given a card. But it's far far far from the most important milestone in Star Wars' resurgence as an epic fantasy entity. The most important milestone happened five years earlier in 1990.

You are so knowledge about Star Wars I'm very surprised a fan so old could forget this huge moment. I'm sure you own this too, but you never mentioned it in your other posts about owning graphic novels and comic books.

The Dark Empire series was the 1st step in my mind. I remember getting the 1st issue and LOVED it. Same with the Zahn novels too. The whole thing was kept alive in the late 80s by West End Games though. Loved those books for the game and the lead miniatures.
Comics were a big step and Dark Empire kicked it off. But the comics and the books are a direct result of a bigger event in 1990 that kicked off the lasting popularity of Star Wars. 1990 is the spark that fires up the rest of the 90s

I’ve said my piece; either you get what I’m saying or you don’t (you don’t).
Did you switch arguments mid-stream from saying the Card Game kicked off the Star Wars rebirth (it didn't) to saying the card game had the biggest lasting impact expanding Star Wars into the future??

Also West End Games SW RPG Sourcebooks there.
This game actually predates the Star Wars revival and maybe in some way helped it. But the movie E.T. helped just as much - probably more.

Surprised no one mentioned video games. There were some great Star Wars games in the 90s. But it's not those either.

Ready for what sparked the 90s Star Wars Rebirth?

Here were go....


  Spoiler:  
What sparked the rebirth??? The Star Wars Trilogy itself. More precisely the Star Wars Trilogy on VHS. Getting to the exact point - Star Wars on VHS for cheap. Tuesday September 11th, 1990 is the first time Star Wars was affordable to own at home. Suddenly people were rediscovering Star Wars. Watching whenever they wanted. And it got the fires of fandom burning again.

And this wasn't even a new release of the films on VHS. New ads were put on the front of the tape sure, but it's the same video transfers from the original 1980s VHS releases. The movies were given updated packaging. And for the first time the movies were sold bundled together as a trilogy. And they were still sold individually as well. There wasn't even that big an advertising push made about it. Not like the 1995 VHS release.

The big switch is the price. Before 1990 each Star Wars film retailed for $79.99. That's $79.99 + tax in 1980s money for just one movie. The retail price for the 1990 releases - $19.99 per film. Now the entire trilogy sold for less than one of the movies cost on VHS in the 80s.
  Spoiler:  

Star Wars for the masses. Own it. Watch it anytime or all the time.

It was owning the movies. Being able to watch them at leisure and being able to really get to know the films that kicked off the 90s popularity of Star Wars. And it's what kept Star Wars popular through the 90s as kids saw them for the first time, and older fans continued to revisit them. People watching the movies at home is what generated interest in the books, the comics, and games. Even the card game is like watching the VHS tape and pausing to see every little detail and every creature. And having Star Wars at home let fans become familiar with the movies in ways they never could at the theater. This is when Empire goes from being regarded as the weakest film to the best.

The cheaper VHS release was a calculated move by Lucasfilm. This was step one to gauge interest in future Star Wars. In a radical move, E.T. - brand new on VHS - sold for $24.99 in 1988 and made a ton of money at this lower price. That changed the way movies were sold and how film studios looked at home video.

Two years later it was Star Wars turn to be released on the cheap. The hope was this would spark renewed interest in Star Wars. If that happened more Star Wars would follow. But first in the fall of 1989 Raiders of the Lost Ark and Temple of Doom were both released at the new more affordable price. This was sort of rushed after E.T.'s success the previous year. It sort of tied in with the tail end of Last Crusade's theatrical release as well as setup 1990's home video release for Last Crusade. For Lucasfilm, 1989 was an Indiana Jones year and it made more sense to release the existing two Indy films for holiday shopping in Fall of '89 before Star Wars.

Indy made mad money on VHS that fall. It did so well Lucasfilm was emboldened to take the next steps with Star Wars even before the cheaper VHS release. So in the fall of 1989 - anticipating solid sales similar to Indiana Jones next year - Lucasfilm green lit two further Star Wars projects that wouldn't break the bank if they weren't hits. Those projects became Heir to the Empire and Dark Empire.

Why a book and comic book? Other than being cheaper - this all goes back to George Lucas pattering his Star Wars business model on author Edgar Rice Burroughs. Burroughs, who wrote Tarzan and John Carter of Mars, turned his successful fantasy fiction into highly successful series of movies, comic books, radio, and merchandise. Burroughs even founded Tarzana California, and built Tarzana Ranch - his home, headquarters, and movie studio. It's pretty much what George Lucas did with Skywalker Ranch. And starting in 1990 Lucasfilm Ltd. begins putting out all the same products Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc. did in the 1920s.

1990 was when this new plan goes into effect.
  Spoiler:  

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Thanks to this we saw the Barge toy released 29 years later.
 
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JediDelight, I stand up and salute you, tip my hat AND give you a slow clap. I was like all right, all right what’s the punchline going to be, and when I finally got to the big reveal I was like DAMN!!! That’s a great point!! I can’t disagree with that being the first big step to getting Star Wars back into everyone’s homes. Well played!
 
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The big switch is the price. Before 1990 each Star Wars film retailed for $79.99. That's $79.99 + tax in 1980s money for just one movie.
Wow I never realized the movies themselves sold for so much. I had ESB and ROTJ both recorded from HBO complete with that old school HBO intro and had both ingrained heavily in my toddler mind before ever seeing ANH for the first time probably around 7 or 8 I'm guessing. I don't even know who recorded them or recall why/how/when they were first shown to me, probably as a means to keep me busy and glued in place. It worked pretty well.

Ahhh, couch fort days and bags of powdered donuts.
 
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It's hard to piece it out becasue we all have things that, for us personally, were THE thing that Made Star Wars Great Again. For me it was West End, hand's down. I was never aware of that edition of the home movies, we were watching dubbed copies or the later gold edition. And we never lost interest so it's hard to gauge if anything actually re-ignited someone else's interest. Not a day went by from 1985 when Kenner ended, till 1999 when TPM came out, that I didn't dedicate substantial brainpower to Star Wars. Though TPM changed that. I dropped out for a long time cause of the prequels.
 
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People tend to forget that back then, you saw a movie in theaters once maybe twice. If you were lucky maybe they showed it on TV.

But as a kid I didn't remember much about the actual film, so while playing with the toys, the characters started with the major beats & we were forced to make our own versions of the characters. Hamerhead might be a drunk in the film but he was a bad@ss because we made our own stories.

I remember later watching Star Wars on the scrambled Showtime signal. (Had sound & a snowy picture.) The movies were rather limited as far as HBO/showtime runs & not released on VHS for a questionably long time.
 
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I didn't see ANH till it had its network broadcast premier around 1986. We of course recorded it. And yeah the toys were more how we related to it than the actual films. I remember around 3rd grade making a concious effort to start seeing the actors instead of the action figures when I imagined the characters.
 
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I think the films in tandem with the 1995 action figures were a very potent team of rousing interest in younger generations like myself. I had the next edition of the VHS movies with the single face and small backdrop for each one (Vader, Stormtrooper, Yoda). That combined with the video games that came out also brought a ton of interest - NES Star Wars was such a fun game, and then Super Star Wars Trilogy on SNES was so fun. N64 Shadows Of The Empire followed that up, then N64 Rogue Squadron and I'd be remiss to leave out the great computer games Dark Forces, X-Wing and Tie Fighter. As a kid, these were a lethal combo of elements. I definitely collected the Card Game but had no idea how to play it and learned a lot from those. I even attribute my Star Wars interest to the "Big Book" that I could always find in my elementary or local libraries - it embedded the images of Luke looking at the sky space battle through his macro binoculars and also Biggs on Tatooine with his academy outfit and cape. It was so cool to see those memories come to life in the deleted scenes with the Blu-Ray set.
 
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I think Lucas could’ve released the special additions to the theaters and made a boatload of money without the Zahn novels. I don’t think anything gets credit for a resurgence. But that’s just me. I was carrying the fire.
 
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That and Dark Horses' output. River of Chaos and the X-Wing series are the first ones I remember that I happened upon when I was in a shop picking up Spawn #s in the 'teens.

I did also grab SW CCG packs at B. Dalton books whenever my mom would stop in for her smut novels. Also West End Games SW RPG Sourcebooks there.
I picked up all 3 of the RPG source books based back in the 90’s. Always filled with great info.
 
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Last night I dreamt I found a really junky POTF Sail Barge that was truly pathetic, not much more than a display stand for a few figures. And I was like "Huh, technically I guess the $500 Sail Barge WASN'T the only time they made one".
 
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Last night I dreamt I found a really junky POTF Sail Barge that was truly pathetic, not much more than a display stand for a few figures. And I was like "Huh, technically I guess the $500 Sail Barge WASN'T the only time they made one".
That STILL would have been a cool Barge at the time haha - kinda makes you wonder what a POTF2 Barge could have looked like. One thing is fore sure, it would have definitely had launching missiles!
 
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That STILL would have been a cool Barge at the time haha - kinda makes you wonder what a POTF2 Barge could have looked like. One thing is fore sure, it would have definitely had launching missiles!
Yes it would! I am trying to source a POTF2 freeze chamber for my kid and the missile launcher cracks me up. It looks like a giant DH-17 pistol which is also funny.
 
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I think the similarity is coincidental.
This was year and years ago now and my memory on this isn't totally clear, but I thought there was some connection between the Power of the Jedi Bespin playset and the 12" Hasbro dolls. Any one remember this?

I think when Star Wars figures restarted in 1995 the toys were largely still designed in Ohio by a division of Hasbro that was pretty much the continuation of Kenner. Maybe not the same buildings, but a lot of the same staff in the same city as Kenner. The 12" doll figures were designed in Rhode Island at Hasbro. In the '90s when things like the Millennium Falcon carrying case were designed by the the Rhode Island part of Hasbro it was talked about online, and you could just sort of tell something wasn't exactly the same.

Eventually the former Kenner branch of Hasbro was relocated to Rhode Island with the rest of Hasbro.

I think the Carbon Freeze playset may have been designed by the Rhode Island team before the merger. It was then delayed for a long time before getting released exclusively during Power of the Jedi. Does this ring bell for anyone?
 
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This was year and years ago now and my memory on this isn't totally clear, but I thought there was some connection between the Power of the Jedi Bespin playset and the 12" Hasbro dolls. Any one remember this?

I think when Star Wars figures restarted in 1995 the toys were largely still designed in Ohio by a division of Hasbro that was pretty much the continuation of Kenner. Maybe not the same buildings, but a lot of the same staff in the same city as Kenner. The 12" doll figures were designed in Rhode Island at Hasbro. In the '90s when things like the Millennium Falcon carrying case were designed by the the Rhode Island part of Hasbro it was talked about online, and you could just sort of tell something wasn't exactly the same.

Eventually the former Kenner branch of Hasbro was relocated to Rhode Island with the rest of Hasbro.

I think the Carbon Freeze playset may have been designed by the Rhode Island team before the merger. It was then delayed for a long time before getting released exclusively during Power of the Jedi. Does this ring bell for anyone?
"Does this ring bell for anyone?" Nope. But I'd be interested to learn more. :)
 
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This was year and years ago now and my memory on this isn't totally clear, but I thought there was some connection between the Power of the Jedi Bespin playset and the 12" Hasbro dolls. Any one remember this?
I'm no historian but I vaguely remember something about this...I think there was a problem with the wedge figure that came with that case too...but a bit too foggy to remember it. There was definitely a mesh of the 2 that occurred and you could see it in some of the designs. Maybe the cruise missile trooper was mixed in too 🤔? Was it outlined in one of the action figure magazines as a blurb or small article? I just can't remember for sure.
 
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Don't spend more than you think it's worth to look at in your living room, if the bottom drops out from that hypothetical warehouse find. Then it's not a problem. The world is full of sad boxes of Beanie Babies and Superman Vol 2, # 75, from people who failed to heed this.
are we talking about the future of POP figs? lol...
 
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Some really good thoughts in this thread.

My take on the Star Wars resurgence is that it all really started with Heir to the Empire. I don't think Lucasfilm expected it to hit #1 on the NY Times bestseller list the way it did. That novel came out in 1991, when I was 18.

I really feel like Star Wars was meant for "my generation." I was 4 when ANH came out. 7 for ESB and 10 for ROJ. I, like so many others, grew up along with the trilogy. By 1991, I was graduating from high school and headed for my freshman year of college.

The Thrawn books came out in 1991, 1992 and 1993. The OT soundtrack box set was released in November 1993, which included never-before-released music, much of which we'd been waiting 10 years for. Word of the prequel trilogy's creation hit mid to late 1994, depending on what sources you find. The trilogy was re-released on VHS in August 1995, to much fanfare and financial success. By the Fall of 1995, new 3.75 inch scale figures were showing up at Toys R Us, Walmart and Target, and the resurgence was well underway. The Special Editions were on the horizon and the prequels not far beyond that.

By 1995, I was 22. Certainly wasn't sitting on a pile of money, but my generation was starting to develop some disposable income. The Lucasfilm bean counters knew we were starting to have money to spend, and planned accordingly. It really was a brilliant long-term plan.
 
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