Jabba's Sail Barge

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Cookie Monster seemed like a great PR move, as he is a lovable iconic character with few reasons to be doubted (he’s been criticized as a calorie eater, but hey, it’s 2019, and no one is immune to controversy). Unicron also made sense as a grand-scale product for a devoted fan base. Cookie seemed like good change-of-pace choice, and Uni a fair balance for another franchise.

But apparently only a few people truly wanted them. We shouldn’t blame Unicron’s failure just on its short 48-day pledge time; it was massively advertised, with its own special booth at SDCC, and had the whole Takara Tomy team promoting it on social media. People knew about this, and have had plenty of chances to support it.

I don’t think that Hasbro realized what a task it was to fund these at those quotas and prices.
I think Hasbro did a very poor job in getting the word out about Cookie Monster. I only saw a couple of articles in the mainstream media/internet on the day the project was announced.

But I never would have seen them unless I specifically went looking for them. I really only know about the project because of visiting SW forums, which is not where busy parents are going to be spending a lot of time!

I don't honestly know the best way to market a high-end toy, but it really feels like they did almost nothing. It's shame it's going to come up so very, very short. It does look like a great product for the right audience.

It's failure will probably have a chilling effect on future Haslab projects.
 
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I think Hasbro did a very poor job in getting the word out about Cookie Monster.

But I never would have seen them unless I specifically went looking for them. I really only know about the project because of visiting SW forums, which is not where busy parents are going to be spending a lot of time!
The same could be said about the Barge. I didn't find out about it until the campaign was already underway.



It's failure will probably have a chilling effect on future Haslab projects.
The Barge had many buyers buying multiples whether they were collectors or speculators. Would the buying practises within the TF and SS community be the same? If Haslab campaigns are only going to be successful when multiples are purchased by each customer I agree this will have an effect on future projects.
 
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It really depends on what they try to make, the Tie Fighter was a terrible choice because there's really no point in having a 6" scale one over a 3 3/4" scale one. There's very limited interaction with actual figures and "flying" it is rather difficult as an adult, much less a child.

A Rancor on the other hand would be a very good thing to have in the 6" scale, plenty of opportunity for play interaction with the black series figures and would be at a size/price point to justify the crowd funding aspect.
Isnt there a 5" scale Rancor coming according to that list Yakface put up?
 
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The same could be said about the Barge. I didn't find out about it until the campaign was already underway.





The Barge had many buyers buying multiples whether they were collectors or speculators. Would the buying practises within the TF and SS community be the same? If Haslab campaigns are only going to be successful when multiples are purchased by each customer I agree this will have an effect on future projects.
I think the Barge made it look too easy. These are big, big ticket items. It was also the subject matter that made it so desirable - I'm not sure anything else has that level of 'OMG I have to get this for the eight year old I once was' factor about it. It was gigantic, it was something that should have been made in 1983 but never was, it was a vehicle and therefore more aggressive looking - it's a beautiful design. It looks like it's in motion rather than looking like a lump of plastic. I'm not sure what else they'd find to make that had that level of wow factor.
 
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The same could be said about the Barge. I didn't find out about it until the campaign was already underway.
Yes, the same thing could be said about the barge. That we heard of it on SW collecting sites. Which is the target audience. SW sites are not the target audience for Cookie Monster.

There are plenty of TF fansites and forums out there, but nothing truly equivalent in the Cookie Monster space, so they needed to do a MUCH better job in getting the word out than they did.


The Barge had many buyers buying multiples whether they were collectors or speculators. Would the buying practises within the TF and SS community be the same? If Haslab campaigns are only going to be successful when multiples are purchased by each customer I agree this will have an effect on future projects.
I would assume, given TF's dedicated toy buying fanbase, that the numbers of boxed collectors, speculators, etc. would probably be about the same percentage wise, as they are for SW/the barge. I don't think those numbers in either case were game changers.

The Barge didn't get funded because enough people bought multiples.
 
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Maybe after the current state of things finish, they will realize that there are Star Wars collectors starved for product.
 
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It’s true that Unicron got much more press than Cookie. I guess all the fans from other franchises who did know about it didn’t want it.
 
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In Unicron's defense, this isn't his first release. How would Fans of the Barge reacted if the Barge was already made about 10-15 years ago? How many people would have backed something they already have?
I feel that it would have seriously lowered the number of backers to only people who never got the first time around, and the truly hard core.

Cookie Monster, IMHO, never stood a chance. Do kids still watch that show today? And how many of them would shell out $300 for a giant blue Teddy bear? So it seems the target would be late 70's or 80's kids who have grown up but were fans of the show. And have a spare $300 to blow.

It's nice that they offered such items, no harm in it. This is how they gauge interest what items to do, and not every one is going to be a winner or even a home run. Surely there's a list ready to go, and they start with the next item on it soon as these are done. But I hope they don't wait till next year to announce the next one.
 
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In Unicron's defense, this isn't his first release. How would Fans of the Barge reacted if the Barge was already made about 10-15 years ago? How many people would have backed something they already have?
I feel that it would have seriously lowered the number of backers to only people who never got the first time around, and the truly hard core.

Cookie Monster, IMHO, never stood a chance. Do kids still watch that show today? And how many of them would shell out $300 for a giant blue Teddy bear? So it seems the target would be late 70's or 80's kids who have grown up but were fans of the show. And have a spare $300 to blow.

It's nice that they offered such items, no harm in it. This is how they gauge interest what items to do, and not every one is going to be a winner or even a home run. Surely there's a list ready to go, and they start with the next item on it soon as these are done. But I hope they don't wait till next year to announce the next one.
Agreed. It's cool they tried things because hey nothing ventured, nothing gained. But absolutely, don't wait another year to announce the next round. Just say hey, these didn't fly, but how about THIS???
 
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Isnt there a 5" scale Rancor coming according to that list Yakface put up?
I don't visit Yakface all that often, where can you find this list?

In Unicron's defense, this isn't his first release. How would Fans of the Barge reacted if the Barge was already made about 10-15 years ago? How many people would have backed something they already have?
Not to mention that thing looks like it has a ton of joints that are liable to snap and I'm guessing little possibility of getting replacements for.
 
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I never knew the Cookie Monster was even for sale :/ and it was so cool! Ah! How did people even know it was for preorder?
 
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The Barge didn't get funded because enough people bought multiples.
I always thought the opposite. I don't think we can really know for sure either way on that. I'd be genuinely interested to know if you have any insider info. I remember observing the counter in real time and watched it go up in 1's or 2's but very frequently in blocks of 5. The orders for 5's I would assume were coming from speculators/dealers. Not that the counter would be a definitive way to make that conclusion, but it was an interesting observation.




Maybe after the current state of things finish, they will realize that there are Star Wars collectors starved for product.
Good point. When the Barge was offered, SW collectors had been starved of anything decent for years.
 
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I never thought that was a good idea but I figured Hasbro knew better than me. I couldn't imagine anyone buying that for $300. Maybe $30.
You clearly have no idea how much money rich parents spend on toys, then. If there was still a robust, accessible line of toy retail stores, something like that would have easily sold.
 
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You clearly have no idea how much money rich parents spend on toys, then. If there was still a robust, accessible line of toy retail stores, something like that would have easily sold.
Disagree. If it were sold at a brick & mortar store, I think the max would be $125-ish to be successful. $300? No way.
 
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Technology has ruined toys. I'm 30 years old, when we were younger we all didn't have iPads and all these other electronics to play with . We actually waited for our favorites shows to play on TV during a scheduled time. o-o I remember sometimes missing Batman the animated series or other cartoons on tv when I was younger because we had to go grocery shopping or do a million other things . Now you can watch whatever show you want whenever you want. Plus all the easy access to gmaes on cellphones . We had Gameboy and gamegear back then but that was it. Toys don't mean nearly as much to this generation as they did to us.
 
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Technology has ruined toys. I'm 30 years old, when we were younger we all didn't have iPads and all these other electronics to play with . We actually waited for our favorites shows to play on TV during a scheduled time. o-o I remember sometimes missing Batman the animated series or other cartoons on tv when I was younger because we had to go grocery shopping or do a million other things . Now you can watch whatever show you want whenever you want. Plus all the easy access to gmaes on cellphones . We had Gameboy and gamegear back then but that was it. Toys don't mean nearly as much to this generation as they did to us.
I agree that having too much at once ruins so many other things that end up going unappreciated. I'm 35 and feel the same as you. Although it's amazing to be able to watch pretty much whatever you want, whenever you want, it's almost too many choices. Not to mention, if we wanted to do something with media as kids, it was either video games (mom's wouldn't let you play for 5 hours in your own room, it was on the main TV set), go on the dial up internet - again, only the ONLY family computer in the house (tying up the phone lines, which kept you swift in your browsing lol) and watch TV, which had to be regularly scheduled shows. I think that left a lot more time for creativity, like creative play with toys and going outside. Now - apps and games have kids constantly glued to their screens, it's a wonder they even look up. Not surprised at all that toys aren't popular with kids. I imagine toys fade out much earlier, like age 5-6. The scary thing is seeing kids operating smartphones with ease around ages 2-3. Parents aren't helping at all. A lot use them as a virtual babysitter.
 
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Late 40's collector here - and I agree with everything said in the last several posts. I do not see how an expensive Sail Barge would ever have sold that well at regular brick & mortar retail stores - especially for $500 - no way. For the most part, an $80 TVC TIE fighter stayed on shelves @ Wal-mart until it was discounted to $20 (earlier this year). So- that gives you an idea of the amount of $ people are willing to spend for toys/collectibles @ retail. I.e., the only way a $500 Sail barge could have been produced/sold & made a profit was as an online-only exclusive, targeted @ collectors - which is what happened.

Kids these days are not buying/collecting toys (SW or otherwise) like we did - and I use the collective "we" to describe those of us that either got into SW with the original 1978-1985 Vintage line (like me) or the much later POTF2/other lines, etc.

I grew up during the late '70's & into the '80's. And, as a kid growing up - collecting SW & some other toys, reading/collecting comic books, and hanging out with my friends were my pastime after school & during the summer months. Other than that:

-We never had cable when I was growing up. So, other than a bare handful of TV channels (many of which had crappy, snowy reception) - I watched very little TV.

-My family only rented VHS tapes rarely, and the selection was limited. Since we never had access to a lot of TV channels (see above) we rarely taped anything off TV.

-Listened to music sometimes, via my parents' vinyl record player or cassette deck. But, limited selection here. Didn't get a then-expensive CD player until much later.

-Had 1 video game console growing up (Atari computer), but, again - limited selection of games, given that they were so expensive.

Flash forward to the past 10 years:

These days kids can watch, listen to, and/or play a plethora of Movies & TV shows/music/video games (respectively) via their easily accessible electronic devices. So, I don't see them collecting and/or interested in playing with toys to any great extent - there are way too many other distractions for them.

I suspect most of those buying SW (and other) action figure lines like Marvel Legends, DC Multiverse, Transformers, etc. are people like us on this board, i.e. older collectors.
 
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True. Far too much entertainment today is geared toward indoor environment. A friend of mine's Sister's Kids almost never went outside, unless it was going between house to car etc.
There was a time when they were in Little League, but only lasted a few years.

I don't know at what exact point kids go from being outside and using imagination, to staying in and using a multitude of devices. I don't necessarily believe it's at the child's insistence, but more about it being a baby sitter. Or simply interested in what's attracting their Parents attention so much.
 
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Technology has ruined toys. I'm 30 years old, when we were younger we all didn't have iPads and all these other electronics to play with . We actually waited for our favorites shows to play on TV during a scheduled time. o-o I remember sometimes missing Batman the animated series or other cartoons on tv when I was younger because we had to go grocery shopping or do a million other things.
I agree that having too much at once ruins so many other things that end up going unappreciated. I'm 35 and feel the same as you. Although it's amazing to be able to watch pretty much whatever you want, whenever you want, it's almost too many choices. Not to mention, if we wanted to do something with media as kids, it was either video games (mom's wouldn't let you play for 5 hours in your own room, it was on the main TV set), go on the dial up internet - again, only the ONLY family computer in the house (tying up the phone lines, which kept you swift in your browsing lol) and watch TV, which had to be regularly scheduled shows. I think that left a lot more time for creativity, like creative play with toys and going outside.
I remember those days well. The '90's weren't that much different than the '80's when it came to technology:

-Yes, the video games were much more advanced - but they were also very expensive. I was in college from the early-mid '90's, and remember playing Super Nintendo & Sega - friends had the systems & games; some favorites were Mortal Kombat, Street Fighter, etc. However, the game systems were quite pricey - as were the games themselves.

-VHS was still king for all of the '90's (though the first DVD's & DVD players came out in '97, they didn't fully become mainstream until probably the mid-200X's).

-Cable TV was a little better than it was in the '80's, with more original programming & more channels, etc. However, not everyone had cable. I was a strapped college student for the first half of the '90's & couldn't afford it - and didn't even have a TV in the second half of the decade.

-I remember dial-up Internet well. I got my first home Internet connection in Fall '98. I remember being impressed by the technology at the time, but in retrospect it was crap. Those early connections were painfully slow & tied up your regular phone line. Streaming was almost nonexistent. I remember downloading the Episode 1 trailer in Spring '99; and, even though it was only about 2-3 minutes long - it took 1-2 hours to download - ha ha. And, if you were online for 4 (or so) hours at a time, the system would kick you off - and you had to log on again. There were times I would get so frustrated with the slowness of the connection & the other limitations - that I didn't even bother to get on.
 
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Late 40's collector here - and I agree with everything said in the last several posts. I do not see how an expensive Sail Barge would ever have sold that well at regular brick & mortar retail stores - especially for $500 - no way. For the most part, an $80 TVC TIE fighter stayed on shelves @ Wal-mart until it was discounted to $20 (earlier this year). So- that gives you an idea of the amount of $ people are willing to spend for toys/collectibles @ retail. I.e., the only way a $500 Sail barge could have been produced/sold & made a profit was as an online-only exclusive, targeted @ collectors - which is what happened.

Kids these days are not buying/collecting toys (SW or otherwise) like we did - and I use the collective "we" to describe those of us that either got into SW with the original 1978-1985 Vintage line (like me) or the much later POTF2/other lines, etc.

I grew up during the late '70's & into the '80's. And, as a kid growing up - collecting SW & some other toys, reading/collecting comic books, and hanging out with my friends were my pastime after school & during the summer months. Other than that:

-We never had cable when I was growing up. So, other than a bare handful of TV channels (many of which had crappy, snowy reception) - I watched very little TV.

-My family only rented VHS tapes rarely, and the selection was limited. Since we never had access to a lot of TV channels (see above) we rarely taped anything off TV.

-Listened to music sometimes, via my parents' vinyl record player or cassette deck. But, limited selection here. Didn't get a then-expensive CD player until much later.

-Had 1 video game console growing up (Atari computer), but, again - limited selection of games, given that they were so expensive.

Flash forward to the past 10 years:

These days kids can watch, listen to, and/or play a plethora of Movies & TV shows/music/video games (respectively) via their easily accessible electronic devices. So, I don't see them collecting and/or interested in playing with toys to any great extent - there are way too many other distractions for them.

I suspect most of those buying SW (and other) action figure lines like Marvel Legends, DC Multiverse, Transformers, etc. are people like us on this board, i.e. older collectors.
Great post, but I think it's worth remembering that fashions and tastes change, and we've seen this with the return of vinyl and other analogue technologies. Those young couples who are hipsters now will be parents eventually and then they might want kids to rediscover imaginative play with toys, physical objects, over digital media. Seeing vinyl albums and record players on sale in my local supermarket makes me think you should never write anything off.
 
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Great post, but I think it's worth remembering that fashions and tastes change, and we've seen this with the return of vinyl and other analogue technologies. Those young couples who are hipsters now will be parents eventually and then they might want kids to rediscover imaginative play with toys, physical objects, over digital media. Seeing vinyl albums and record players on sale in my local supermarket makes me think you should never write anything off.
I really hope this happens. I'm 52, grew up listening to my moms old 45's from the 50's. It amazes me that vinyl has made a comeback. (I still just call them records)
It would be really nice to see toys become the new toys once again.
 
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Vinyl records are one thing. I'm puzzled as to their current popularity - but, in any case, IMHO they are a niche format that seems to be of primary interest to hipsters. I grew up with these to some extent (listened to them as a kid in the late '70's/early '80's) and don't miss the format at all. I strongly prefer CD's & digital.

However, toys are completely different; I just don't see their being as accessible as much as they were in the past. For one thing, the brick & mortar toy stores that sell new product have severely diminished since the '80's/'90's/200X's. Stores like TRU & Kay-bee toys are completely gone, and the shelf-space for toys @ existing stores like Wal-mart & Target have shrunk considerably. We're already seeing a move to online-only for some toys; and, many toys are next-to-impossible to find @ retail, so people need to order these online if they want them.

Again, I feel the primary customers re: action figures/vehicles these days are older collectors (not kids) - like those of us on this board.
 
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Vinyl records are one thing. I'm puzzled as to their current popularity - but, in any case, IMHO they are a niche format that seems to be of primary interest to hipsters. I grew up with these to some extent (listened to them as a kid in the late '70's/early '80's) and don't miss the format at all. I strongly prefer CD's & digital.

However, toys are completely different; I just don't see their being as accessible as much as they were in the past. For one thing, the brick & mortar toy stores that sell new product have severely diminished since the '80's/'90's/200X's. Stores like TRU & Kay-bee toys are completely gone, and the shelf-space for toys @ existing stores like Wal-mart & Target have shrunk considerably. We're already seeing a move to online-only for some toys; and, many toys are next-to-impossible to find @ retail, so people need to order these online if they want them.

Again, I feel the primary customers re: action figures/vehicles these days are older collectors (not kids) - like those of us on this board.
Records are back because they deter people from simply downloading and burning music. They actually made Record Players and Records better than ever and capable of exceeding CD quality out of desperation.
 
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Records are back because they deter people from simply downloading and burning music. They actually made Record Players and Records better than ever and capable of exceeding CD quality out of desperation.
I think records maintain such popularity because for one, they are huge, have excellent album art, great pull-out liner notes and photography and of course, sound warm and less sterile. I'm not vinyl head by any means, but I own a few. I also think it hearkens back to a time when albums deserved to be on vinyl, because they were worth listening to from front to back, or from side 1 to side 2 lol. These days, it's all about the hot take single - easily digestible, eaten up, discarded, replaced with the next one. I mean seriously - when's the last time in popular music that someone actually cut a true "album"? The last pop effort that even impressed me with songwriting and thematic feel was Kacey Musgraves' Grammy winner Golden Hour. Shiny production, but retro in a lot of ways. I'm a songwriter and guitarist myself, so I feel very strongly about listening to an entire album, though I break my rule from time to time just to buy a single on iTunes. Otherwise, I'm buying CDs still. It forces me to listen to the whole worth of an album - although after I get a feel for it, of course I skip tracks.

Back to the Barge, I think all of this talk was related. Adult collectors wanted something that could give them the feeling of all those great 80s and 90s playsets and a place to display their figures. The Barge is so perfect for that. Add the companion pieces of the previously released Sarlacc and the new Skiff with the guards and holy smokes, it's like reliving the Kenner days. I never got the live the Kenner days because they were petering out while I was becoming a conscious toy fan in the 80s. He-Man was my first, followed by Ghostbusters, but Star Wars followed swiftly behind and quickly overtook them.
 
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A thought occurred to me (and I'm assuming this has already been brought up), but with no word yet on whether Hasbro is going to continue on with the license, and the fact that it took years and years to do the Sail Barge, any speculation as to whether or not this is the end for Hasbro/Star Wars and they wanted to do the Sail Barge as a "thank you" to us? Just a random thought, not based on any reports/rumors/facts/or anything.
 
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A thought occurred to me (and I'm assuming this has already been brought up), but with no word yet on whether Hasbro is going to continue on with the license, and the fact that it took years and years to do the Sail Barge, any speculation as to whether or not this is the end for Hasbro/Star Wars and they wanted to do the Sail Barge as a "thank you" to us? Just a random thought, not based on any reports/rumors/facts/or anything.

That was a thought of mine as well but more with the reissue of the original vintage figures. It’s most likely they finally figured out we didn’t want there junk from the terrible Disney SW movies and they decided they better make some classic OT items that were sure to sell and pump some life into a dead product line. In my area there has been zero New Star Wars product at any retailer. I think it was most likely the same everywhere. Even the retailers were saying no thanks no thanks.
 
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A thought occurred to me (and I'm assuming this has already been brought up), but with no word yet on whether Hasbro is going to continue on with the license, and the fact that it took years and years to do the Sail Barge, any speculation as to whether or not this is the end for Hasbro/Star Wars and they wanted to do the Sail Barge as a "thank you" to us? Just a random thought, not based on any reports/rumors/facts/or anything.
I've been wondering this, if it's a 'going out with a bang' thing. When I saw the Luke three pack I couldn't believe how good the sculpts were and that too made me wonder if they were trying to sign off with a flourish.
 
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Also the fact it took 20 years for them to make a new Yak Face despite how popular he is among collectors.
 
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A thought occurred to me (and I'm assuming this has already been brought up), but with no word yet on whether Hasbro is going to continue on with the license, and the fact that it took years and years to do the Sail Barge, any speculation as to whether or not this is the end for Hasbro/Star Wars and they wanted to do the Sail Barge as a "thank you" to us? Just a random thought, not based on any reports/rumors/facts/or anything.
That was a thought of mine as well but more with the reissue of the original vintage figures. It’s most likely they finally figured out we didn’t want there junk from the terrible Disney SW movies and they decided they better make some classic OT items that were sure to sell and pump some life into a dead product line. In my area there has been zero New Star Wars product at any retailer. I think it was most likely the same everywhere. Even the retailers were saying no thanks no thanks.

I suppose this is a possibility, but even though there hasn't been anything official one way or the other, I can't see Hasbro walking away. We know there are more movies and series coming. Hasbro is already equipped to handle the Star Wars brand. They have plans announced for 2020, like the Vintage style card 6" figure line for the ESB 40th. They did announce the pick up of the Master License for Ghostbusters toys, and they picked up Power last year. That *could* be a way to help ease the blow of letting Star Wars go, should they choose to walk away. I personally can't see them NOT re-upping. But maybe it's not their choice.
 
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I suppose this is a possibility, but even though there hasn't been anything official one way or the other, I can't see Hasbro walking away. We know there are more movies and series coming. Hasbro is already equipped to handle the Star Wars brand. They have plans announced for 2020, like the Vintage style card 6" figure line for the ESB 40th. They did announce the pick up of the Master License for Ghostbusters toys, and they picked up Power last year. That *could* be a way to help ease the blow of letting Star Wars go, should they choose to walk away. I personally can't see them NOT re-upping. But maybe it's not their choice.
The only issue I foresee is Disney deciding they want to do it themselves. Yeah there’s the issue of infrastructure and all the costs of doing it themselves, but they seem to be dabbling more and more in that realm. And Disney LOVES to make money so if they can avoid paying someone else a penny, they’ll do it. I mean I understand they are in the business of making money, but they are ****ing obsessed with it. They weren’t content to let other streaming services get a piece of the pie so they yanked all their content and are starting their own so they get 100% of the money. Look at the fight over Spider-Man, I think Sony blew it by asking for such a large cut after Disney supplied the directors and films and all that brought spider into the mcu, and even though everyone loved Spider-Man coming to the mcu Disney said we’d rather take our ball and go home than share one cent more with Sony.
 
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The only issue I foresee is Disney deciding they want to do it themselves. Yeah there’s the issue of infrastructure and all the costs of doing it themselves, but they seem to be dabbling more and more in that realm. And Disney LOVES to make money so if they can avoid paying someone else a penny, they’ll do it. I mean I understand they are in the business of making money, but they are ****ing obsessed with it. They weren’t content to let other streaming services get a piece of the pie so they yanked all their content and are starting their own so they get 100% of the money. Look at the fight over Spider-Man, I think Sony blew it by asking for such a large cut after Disney supplied the directors and films and all that brought spider into the mcu, and even though everyone loved Spider-Man coming to the mcu Disney said we’d rather take our ball and go home than share one cent more with Sony.
Even IF Disney decided to do it themselves, they would still need a company like Hasbro. Disney doesn't make the toys in their own factories. They contract to other companies to make the toys. Look at the build a droid figures as an example. They used Hasbro to get the line going. Now, supposedly they are "doing it themselves", but I'm sure Hasbro is still making and supplying the parts. They just told Hasbro to remove their branding.
 
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If Disney ever buys Hasbro, then we'll know they will start doing it "in house". I'm sure they feel "at the moment,why mess with a good thing".
 
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Even IF Disney decided to do it themselves, they would still need a company like Hasbro. Disney doesn't make the toys in their own factories. They contract to other companies to make the toys. Look at the build a droid figures as an example. They used Hasbro to get the line going. Now, supposedly they are "doing it themselves", but I'm sure Hasbro is still making and supplying the parts. They just told Hasbro to remove their branding.
They have branched out though with that Sandcrawler they recently did. It seems like they're testing the waters. I mean ultimately, who knows. I have no strong conviction one way or another that Disney will start doing their own thing, but they have done the die cast figures, the 12" detailed figures, the 12" electronic figures (or maybe they're 14") and those little PVC things, and those stylized figures, so somebody that isn't Hasbro is making those for them. So it's not entirely out of the realm of possibility, but I'm just purely speculating based on their rabid desire to make money, money, money!
 
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They have branched out though with that Sandcrawler they recently did. It seems like they're testing the waters. I mean ultimately, who knows. I have no strong conviction one way or another that Disney will start doing their own thing, but they have done the die cast figures, the 12" detailed figures, the 12" electronic figures (or maybe they're 14") and those little PVC things, and those stylized figures, so somebody that isn't Hasbro is making those for them. So it's not entirely out of the realm of possibility, but I'm just purely speculating based on their rabid desire to make money, money, money!
I do totally understand what you are saying. But my point is while it has the "Disney" name, someone had to manufacture that Sandcrawler for them. Hasbro holds the master license for Star Wars. Which means they have to give permission to any company that makes toys, specifically the 3.75" scale. I don't see Hasbro allowing anyone else to do so. I would assume that like the build a droid parts, the Sandscrawler was probably made by Hasbro, and once again, per Disney specs or request, the Hasbro brand is nowhere to be seen. The little PVC figures are probably being made by Applause, or whatever company took over for that kind of product. Hasbro has also given Jakks Pacific permission to make the "Big Figs". When Master Replica lost the license for Star Wars, Hasbro picked up the Force F/X sabers. When they started making them, they were almost, if not exact, copies of what MR did. Now "Disney" also has the same type of saber. So once again, who is making them for Disney?

I'm not arguing that they are clearly all about maximizing profits and getting every buck they can. Just look at the cost of admission into the park, and the price of pretty much EVERYTHING at Galaxy' Edge!

There have been rumors for years about Disney buying Hasbro. That would tie everything together. There would be no need to negotiate the cost of the license, because they would own it. Still letting Hasbro do the work, because of the long history. Hopefully we get some information about either renewing or letting it go fairly soon. The last time they renewed, it was two years before it was set to expire. It could come down to a last minute contract with only days left. I still lean more to them already renewing, or being very close, and they are waiting for some reason to make the announcement.

To try and bring the thread back to topic..... I'm STILL kicking myself for not making arrangements to get in on the barge! Maybe in a few years I'll find some stripped down, torn apart hull at a yard sale. We all know kids seems to completely destroy toys these days. Then I'll spend the next two years searching parts on ebay and spending way too much to rebuild it!
 
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I do totally understand what you are saying. But my point is while it has the "Disney" name, someone had to manufacture that Sandcrawler for them. Hasbro holds the master license for Star Wars. Which means they have to give permission to any company that makes toys, specifically the 3.75" scale. I don't see Hasbro allowing anyone else to do so. I would assume that like the build a droid parts, the Sandscrawler was probably made by Hasbro, and once again, per Disney specs or request, the Hasbro brand is nowhere to be seen. The little PVC figures are probably being made by Applause, or whatever company took over for that kind of product. Hasbro has also given Jakks Pacific permission to make the "Big Figs". When Master Replica lost the license for Star Wars, Hasbro picked up the Force F/X sabers. When they started making them, they were almost, if not exact, copies of what MR did. Now "Disney" also has the same type of saber. So once again, who is making them for Disney?

I'm not arguing that they are clearly all about maximizing profits and getting every buck they can. Just look at the cost of admission into the park, and the price of pretty much EVERYTHING at Galaxy' Edge!

There have been rumors for years about Disney buying Hasbro. That would tie everything together. There would be no need to negotiate the cost of the license, because they would own it. Still letting Hasbro do the work, because of the long history. Hopefully we get some information about either renewing or letting it go fairly soon. The last time they renewed, it was two years before it was set to expire. It could come down to a last minute contract with only days left. I still lean more to them already renewing, or being very close, and they are waiting for some reason to make the announcement.

To try and bring the thread back to topic..... I'm STILL kicking myself for not making arrangements to get in on the barge! Maybe in a few years I'll find some stripped down, torn apart hull at a yard sale. We all know kids seems to completely destroy toys these days. Then I'll spend the next two years searching parts on ebay and spending way too much to rebuild it!
All good points. I guess ultimately I’m hoping they don’t renew for purely selfish reasons: I had no idea in 1995 when I started collecting this line I’d still be doing it in 2019! Don’t get me wrong, I don’t regret the stuff I’ve gotten, but I’d also be okay if some other company took over because then that would give me a good stopping point!
 
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I agree. Adam Pawlus has been dropping reasonably poorly-disguised hints to this effect in his weekly Q&A column. As an industry insider he would be in the know but unable to break any confidentiality. That's the way I read a lot of his recent commentary, anyway.
 
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