A little history

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KENNER STAR WARS ACTION FIGURES
3 3/4" scale, 1977-1985

Production of the action figures started in 1977 with the release of the first Star Wars film, but they didn't reach the masses until early 1978. Over the next 8 years, it would go on to become one of the most successful toy lines ever made.

The final figures released in 1985 had cardbacks displaying 92 figures with "Collect all 92!", but there were a few more. There were 21 figures based on Star Wars (1977-1979), 29 figures based on The Empire Strikes Back (1980-1982), 31 figures based on Return of the Jedi (1983-1984), and 15 figures from the final Power of the Force line in 1985, which adds up to 96, not 92. Here are the other figures.

93. Yak Face

This rare 93rd figure was only supposed to be available outside the U.S. market. There are rumors of a handful making it to select U.S. retail shelves.

94. R2-D2
95. R2-D2 with Sensorscope

"Collect all 92!" lists R2-D2 with pop-up Lightsaber. It leaves out the original R2-D2 and the R2-D2 with Sensorscope that were previously sold as individual carded figures.

96. C-3PO

"Collect all 92!" lists the C-3PO with Removable Limbs, but leaves out the original C-3PO, which was also sold as an individual carded figure.

Most people consider 96 the official number, at least for individual carded action figures. However, there are other figures up for debate.

97. Sy Snootles
98. Max Rebo
99. Droopy McCool

All included in the Sy Snootles and the Rebo Band Action Figure Set, 3 pack.

100. Blue Snaggletooth

A rare blue Snaggletooth figure was sold in early editions of the Sears Star Wars Cantina Adventure Set. The full-size figure in blue gear was soon replaced by a more accurate shorter figure in a red gear. The blue version of Snaggletooth was never sold as an individual carded figure.

101. R2-D2 with removable middle leg Included in the Droid Factory Playset

102. Dianoga trash compactor monster
Included with the Death Star Space Station

103. Jabba the Hutt
104. Salacious Crumb
Both included in the Jabba the Hutt Action Playset

105. Han Solo in carbonite chamber
Included in Slave 1, Boba Fett's Spaceship

106. Imperial Probe Droid
Included in the Turret and Probot Playset

Creatures

107. Patrol Dewback
108. Tauntaun
109. Tauntaun (with open belly)
110. Hoth Wampa
111. Rancor Monster

Variants
Many of the vintage figures contained minor variations, usually just simple paint differences. The blue Snagletooth is the only figure different enough for me to consider counting it as a unique figure. Some of the more notable variants are; early Lightsaber's were double telescoping, early Han Solo's had a smaller head that was later changed to a larger one, and early Jawa's had a vinyl cape before switching to a cloth robe.

Rocket-Firing Boba Fett

This is the most infamous Star Wars action figure. About 100 prototypes were made, but the figure was deemed unsafe and never made it to retail with a functioning rocket-fire. The prototypes that survived are among the most valuable action figures of all time.

Droids and Ewoks (1985)

Kenner released 13 figures based on the animated series Droids and 6 figures based on the animated series Ewoks. These figures were 3 3/4" scale but were a little more cartoon like in appearance and included some characters not necessarily associated with the original trilogy films.

Numerous other playsets, vehicles, mini-rigs, and carrying cases were made in the line.

The line ended in 1985 with more than 300 million action figures sold. No Star Wars action figures would be made for 10 years, and by that time, Kenner had been sold to Hasbro.
 
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The line actually ended in 1988 with Vlix
The Droids line is on the fringe of Star Wars action figures, and Glasslite isn't Kenner, but I guess you could say some figures were produced in the late 1980's. The production numbers were tiny compared to the original run and they were sold only in South America.
 
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If you include the Droids line, then I guess Vlix would be last. Produced in 1987, made it to store shelves in early 1988 but this was a very small limited run and sold only in South America.
Just because not many were produced does not mean they don’t count. Non Droids figures were also released by Glasslite. Markings on cardbacks say 1988.
 
the Bespin Security Guard came with either a white or black skin tone but they only counted it as one figure in the line.
This is incorrect. Both figures continued to appear on the back packaging from the release on the 48 back and while both are identically named as Bespin Security Guard, both versions are always present.

POTF Back.jpg

You can see here, figure 67 is Bespin Security Guard and so is figure 37.

What's your position on the three unique Takara sculpted figures: Vader, Threepio and Stormtrooper?
 
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The Droids line is on the fringe of Star Wars action figures, and Glasslite isn't Kenner, but I guess you could say some figures were produced in the late 1980's. The production numbers were tiny compared to the original run and they were sold only in South America.
True Glasslite isn’t Kenner. Palitoy isn’t Kenner either. Do Palitoys count? All come from Kenner molds. All were designed by Kenner and sold with Kenners permission via paid contracts.
 
Thank you for posting. I think this highlights just how difficult it is to be a star wars vintage collector in a community of collectors. Something as simple as "I'm gonna list the whole set of figures someone can have" is nit picked to death. Where to draw the line regarding foreign productions, figure variants, what counts as a playset or vehicle accessory vs a figure in its own right and even what year to stop counting have been debatable for over 30 years. Every collector has their own list and that is fine.

I am continually amazed by the people who publish books or websites to document these things and how deep they have to go and what decisions they must justify or acquiesce to appease the masses.
 
I am continually amazed by the people who publish books or websites to document these things and how deep they have to go and what decisions they must justify or acquiesce to appease the masses.
more like ***** :LOL:

they won't let me post what i want --but it rhymes with masses ---just lose the ma
 
sses?

🤪

Anyway... I really miss the cardbacks that show the figures. Remember the posters that had all the 30th Anniversary or Legacy figures on it all standing together.... Love.
1673024635988.png
 
This is incorrect. Both figures continued to appear on the back packaging from the release on the 48 back and while both are identically named as Bespin Security Guard, both versions are always present.

View attachment 447665

You can see here, figure 67 is Bespin Security Guard and so is figure 37.

What's your position on the three unique Takara sculpted figures: Vader, Threepio and Stormtrooper?
Thanks, you're right. I made an edit.
 
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Final Edit
Kenner Star Wars Action Figures
3 3/4" scale, 1977-1985

Production of the action figures started in 1977 with the release of the first Star Wars film, but they didn't reach the masses until early 1978. It would go on to become one of the most successful toy lines ever produced.

The final action figures that were released in 1985 had cardbacks displaying 92 figures with "Collect all 92!" written at the top. There were 21 figures based on Star Wars (1977-1979), 29 figures based on The Empire Strikes Back (1980-1982), 31 figures based on Return of the Jedi (1983-1984), and 15 figures from the final Power of the Force line in 1985, which adds up to 96, not 92. Here are the other 4 figures.

93. Yak Face
This rare 93rd figure never appeared on a cardback. It was only supposed to be available outside the U.S. market, but there are rumors of a handful making it to select U.S. retail shelves.

94. R2-D2
95. R2-D2 with Sensorscope
"Collect all 92!" lists R2-D2 with pop-up Lightsaber. It leaves out the original R2-D2 and the R2-D2 with Sensorscope that were previously sold as individual carded figures.

96. C-3PO
"Collect all 92!" lists the C-3PO with Removable Limbs, but leaves out the original C-3PO, which was also sold as an individual carded figure.

Most people consider 96 the official number, at least for individual carded action figures. However, there are many other figures up for debate.

97. Sy Snootles
98. Max Rebo
99. Droopy McCool
All included in the Sy Snootles and the Rebo Band Action Figure Set, 3 pack.

100. Blue Snaggletooth
A rare blue Snaggletooth figure was sold in early editions of the Sears Star Wars Cantina Adventure Set. The full-size figure in blue gear was soon replaced by a more accurate shorter figure in a red gear. The blue version of Snaggletooth was never sold as an individual carded figure.

101. R2-D2 with removable middle leg Included in the Droid Factory Playset

102. Dianoga trash compactor monster
Included with the Death Star Space Station

103. Jabba the Hutt
104. Salacious Crumb
Both included in the Jabba the Hutt Action Playset

105. Han Solo in carbonite chamber
Included in Slave 1, Boba Fett's Spaceship

106. Imperial Probe Droid
Included in the Turret and Probot Playset

Creatures
107. Patrol Dewback
108. Tauntaun
109. Tauntaun (with open belly)
110. Hoth Wampa
111. Rancor Monster

Variants
Many of the vintage figures contained minor variations, usually just simple paint/coloring differences. The blue Snagletooth is the only figure different enough for me to consider counting it as a unique figure. Some of the more notable variants are; early Lightsaber's were double telescoping, early Han Solo's had a smaller head that was later changed to a larger one, and early Jawa's had a vinyl cape before switching to a cloth robe.

Rocket-Firing Boba Fett
This is the most infamous Star Wars action figure. About 100 prototypes were made, but the figure was deemed unsafe and never made it to retail with a functioning rocket-fire. The prototypes that survived are among the most valuable action figures of all time.

Droids and Ewoks
Beginning in 1985, Kenner released 13 figures based on the animated series Droids and 6 figures based on the animated series Ewoks. These figures were 3 3/4" scale but were a little more cartoon like in appearance and included some characters not necessarily associated with the original trilogy films.

Numerous other playsets, vehicles, mini-rigs, and carrying cases were made in the line.

When the line wrapped up, more than 300 million action figures had been sold. By the time new action figures came out, Power of the Force (2) in 1995, Kenner had been sold to Hasbro.
 
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I love this list! It’s always neat to revisit this stuff and see how much I can remember. It’s true that every post is slightly different, and many do include some interesting surprises!
 
Loved the lists, I have them all, except for the rocket firing Fett, I bought a reproduction which is fine with me.
 
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