Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Looking for Advice on Collection Downsizing

  1. #11
    I used to just send everything I didn't want to my nephews. But they are getting older now and I kind of think it might do more harm than good to just unload toys on kids when they get into their teenage years. All you are basically doing is teaching them that they never have to work for anything and they are entitled to get everything they want for free.

    So, now I just donate stuff to the Salvation Army. Sure, they own stores and resell the items, but their businesses provide jobs and income for people who would otherwise be unemployed and even homeless. So it's still a good cause.

    If I have actual vintage stuff (1978-1985) that I want to get rid of (which is happening less and less frequently these days), then I have a friend who is always interested in buying my stuff. Otherwise, I just put it up on eBay. For vintage Kenner toys, selling everything individually is almost always worth the time and effort.
    Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split. - Robert E. Howard

  2. #12
    Thanks for the input everyone. I do wish I had someone I knew in person who would appreciate them. If I could find a local buyer I'd gladly take $2 a figure for most of them but we barely have any flea market-type outlets here. Have a couple but they already have random Star Wars toys from the same era rotting in display cases and in booths for years so I figure it's not worth trying to sell mine off at these locations.

    I guess I just feel bad about giving them away because most of them were gifts from family including my grandma, who's no longer with me and I just have this feeling like I'm throwing away gifts they bought for me. Other issue is some of the stuff seems to be worth a least a good $10-$20 here and there and I'm not really in a position to turn down cash. I think I'm going to have a family member look into the local facebook buy/sell group for me (since I don't use it) but I'm not expecting any bites. All in all I think I have about 5 storage tubs full of stuff I want to offload but I know a lot of it is going to be a hard sell. I've got everything from carded figures to multi-figure packs to vehicles to completely random stuff like board games, coin banks and a big stuffed Jar Jar Binks with a Pit Droid alarm... (No I didn't ask for that!)
    Last edited by Okami; 08-28-2019 at 04:53 AM.

  3. #13
    Send you a pm about this.

  4. #14
    To those who have a lot of SW stuff (or other belongings) that they don't want but are still not sure about unloading, make sure you do eventually get rid of this stuff so your place doesn't end up looking like this guy's - LOL:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLJjiXFMUwg

    Quote Originally Posted by bigbarada View Post
    So, now I just donate stuff to the Salvation Army. Sure, they own stores and resell the items, but their businesses provide jobs and income for people who would otherwise be unemployed and even homeless. So it's still a good cause.
    Agree 100%. I feel the same way about Goodwill (not that many Salvation Army's around here to donate to). Though I know Goodwill is a business that sells their donations, here is my take on this:

    -They do employ people who would otherwise probably not have work.

    -They sell the items that are donated for reasonable prices, so people who go in there - who want the items - are getting them for a lot cheaper than they would anywhere else. Obviously, the items are used - but that may not matter to some people.

    The above reasons are primarily why I prefer to donate items (that I don't give to relatives) to a charity instead of trying to sell them. I.e., I wouldn't get much money for these anyway - and, IMHO they're going to a worthwhile cause. Plus, I have donated items in unopened packages - so, when the charity sells these particular ones - whoever buys them will be getting a brand new item.

  5. #15
    I have heard locally in this area. The Goodwill president has said about current employees that have challenges. She said if they can not work they shouldn't be here. I personally thought the comment was out of line and rude. I have since not donated anything to Goodwill or plan on it. Also, had a friend that passed away before Christmas. Her car since it was becoming difficult to transfer it,due to still being in her deceased husbands name. It got donated to Goodwill. It was a nice car with low mileage. Instead of them reselling it, they just crushed it for scrap. So two instances where this company doesn't do the correct thing. I now give to a local store that helps abused women and families.
    Last edited by r2d6kelly; 08-28-2019 at 09:27 AM.

  6. #16
    It's tough for sure, especially if you're in a small town. In the city there are many outlets, including craigslist. What Ive learned is that there is a market for almost anything. Eventually there will be a collector who decides he has a hole in his collection and wants that stuff. The question is whether you can find that guy.
    Naughtiest lines in Star Wars:
    You came in that thing?! You're braver than I thought!
    Luke, at that speed will we be able to pull out in time?
    Back door huh? Good idea.

  7. #17
    Good to know re: Goodwill. I typically will donate items in convenient charity drop boxes around where I live; not sure if they're Goodwill or not.

    However, I will say that - despite the above - donating items in decent shape to Goodwill has to be better than throwing them away in the trash or dump. At least - if you're giving them away, someone out there may get some use out of them. Just my .02
    Last edited by ThallJoben; 08-28-2019 at 12:52 PM.

  8. #18
    I gave all my carded figures to my daughter when she was three.
    it was glorious.

    now she's a teenager and we've got a huge rubbermaid-bin full of "loose" figures. LOL
    I have no idea what to do with them. again. LOL
    Last edited by Cobalt60; 08-28-2019 at 07:15 PM.
    "Is there anyone on this ship, who even remotely, looks like Satan?" -- James Kirk, U.S.S. Enterprise.

  9. #19
    What led to all of the hoarding and perceived value back in '95 was the fact that even loose vintage figures were selling for $50 or more, never mind the hundreds, even thousands of dollars some MOC figures were going for. Vehicles, too. Also, remember that these were the days of the price guides, which people you tried to sell stuff to at Flea Markets would ignore, but people still believed those numbers. Few realized it was the scarcity of packaged vintage figures that made them so valuable, since most of us actually opened them and played with them! A lot of idiots likely felt, for example, "if one vintage figure is worth X amount of dollars 10 years later, then I must buy TEN of each of these new figures - then I'll make 10 times that much money in 10 years."

    As for that Leia, she was initially one per case, and not in every case assortment, as was common (yet ridiculous) for toy lines to shortpack the female figures (Cheetara was near impossible to find for the old Thundercats line). Ironically, it was the fact that ebay didn't exist that drove the prices up. While you can often get decent prices on there today from scalpers due to competition, in 1995, scalpers were simply the local flea market guys who walked into TRU, cleared the pegs to CAUSE scarceness, then charged whatever they wanted because there was little to no competition, and they WERE the only way you could buy the figure, unless you beat them to it in the store. Hence the $50-$80 Leias until she appeared in more frequently in Wave 2, at which point the moronically shortpacked Lando saw his value go up. We had a guy like this from the local flea market who would wait outside for the stores to open, as TRU was notorious for stocking during the night. Once we figured it out, a bunch of fans and other scalpers started doing the same thing. Only reason I figured it out was, when the SOTE wave came out, I went to TRU no more than 10 minutes after opening, and this father with his kid told me he saw the flea market guy walk out with the entire case that was on the pegs. As a collector who was still relatively young (in college) and naive, this whole thing was a huge learning experience for me, especially when I tried to sell a few loose vintage figures (ones I had multiples of ) for quick cash, and walked out with less than $10, because, as I was told, "we don't look at price guides."

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by ThallJoben View Post
    make sure you do eventually get rid of this stuff so your place doesn't end up looking like this guy's - LOL:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLJjiXFMUwg
    Collecting goals right there.

    Seriously, though, I felt like I needed to wear gloves and a respirator just to watch that video. I'm sure there are plenty of great finds hidden in there, but I wouldn't be able to deal with all the dirt and the smell.
    Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split. - Robert E. Howard

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •