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Thread: The Plan to Save Solo makes NO SENSE!

  1. #71
    ^^ consider: the only reason children are afraid of fire, is NOT because they have actually burned their fingers on a candle in recent memory..
    it is because of their parents reactions to fire.

    children naturally fear the things that their parents protect them from -- if parents protect them from 'strangers' then the children will fear strangers;
    it parents protect them from "peanuts" then they will naturally fear peanuts;
    if parents protect them from [insert: 'group' of people here] then they will naturally fear [insert: 'group' of people here] -- ((be it 'commies', 'liberals', 'blacks', or 'whites' -- take your pick)).

    coddling children by protecting them from 'movies' only makes them more sensitive -- it's like building an immune system:
    if you 'protect' children from every known pathogen, then you're creating a child who can't exist outside of a sterile bubble -- this does not "prepare" them for life in the Real World.

    movies can be used as teaching tools which allow people to experience (and THINK ABOUT) things , which they would NOT want to experience in real life.
    the "fire" scene in Dumbo, for example -- this might traumatize young children. you might want to censor it, so your kids are NEVER exposed to such a frightening scenario involving a cartoon elephant.
    BUT isn't it better , that they experience this 'fear of fire' in a movie theater.. rather than a "real" inferno? (or rather than 'not at all'?)


    when my daughter was young, I would (jokingly) shield her eyes when there was too much 'kissing' on screen. now she has an actual aversion to PDA's.
    to the point where, I'm starting to wonder if I'll ever have grandchildren. (oops, my bad).
    Last edited by Cobalt60; 11-24-2018 at 09:15 AM.
    "Is there anyone on this ship, who even remotely, looks like Satan?" -- James Kirk, U.S.S. Enterprise.

  2. #72
    Well, it's not that simple really.

    A child's brain hasn't developed cognitive reasoning at that early stage, so it has to rely on adults to teach it basic things. Being "afraid" of fire is one of them as they just don't have the reasoning power to figure out that if fire can burn wood, plastic, paper and whatnot, then there's a good chance that it'll burn them too. Later on we can generally put two and two together and come up with reasonable mental equations as to why a certain thing may happen and to therefore treat it with respect or avoid it altogether.

    But a child's development isn't solely based on their parent's fear and there are plenty of examples where a child will reject their parent's restrictions, too, in favour of finding out for themselves. We are naturally curious creatures.

    However, that doesn't mean that a child should be exposed to everything and a parent be completely laissez faire about it. For instance, I wouldn't show a kid 'Jaws'. That film is far too intense and bloody for a young child and to this day, I find it remarkable that Spielberg got that released as a PG movie. But, I find that there is a very strict "cotton wool" approach to parenting today that shields children far too much and that goes for entertainment media too.

  3. #73
    well obviously, you can't just expose them to 'anything', any more than you would protect them from 'everything'.
    there are no absolutes, you have to find a balance.

    and, I think the original SW found that balance pretty well. [on topic]
    it wasn't just a "kid's movie" -- (dude at the cantina gets his arm chopped off) -- any more than it was just an adult's movie, (like Jaws).

    I think we can both agree that today's 'strict cotton wool approach' goes a little too far -- there's no balance anymore
    people are taking everything too seriously; getting offended (and playing their 'victim card') at the drop of every hat; "protecting" their children from 'far too much'. as you say.
    Last edited by Cobalt60; 11-23-2018 at 05:56 PM.
    "Is there anyone on this ship, who even remotely, looks like Satan?" -- James Kirk, U.S.S. Enterprise.

  4. #74
    I think we all have a slight aversion to PDA though, right?

    Also, my parents "protected" me from rated R movies. But I'm not afraid of those breasts popping out in Porky's. So your logic/theory may be flawed.
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  5. #75
    here's another example. with my son, I protected him from dogs. more specifically, the neighbor's dog.
    (it was totally untrained and jumped all over people trying to hump their legs).
    every time that little beast was around, I scooped my baby up to avoid the confrontation.

    ^ this evolved to a point where, as a toddler, if my kid saw a dog at the park (any dog) he would immediately reach to be picked up.
    he became nervous and agitated if he saw a dog, even a hundred feet away.

    ^^ this evolved to a point where, even now as a full-grown 26 year old, he has an irrational fear of dogs. (oops, my bad).



    a good way to avoid this would have been, to introduce the kid to dogs at an early age, and make sure he had some good experiences.
    (like "building an immune system"). this would teach him that there's nothing to fear.

    but instead... he learned to fear all dogs, BECAUSE I foolishly went out of my way, to 'protect' him from puppies. this phobia could have been avoided.
    Last edited by Cobalt60; 11-24-2018 at 10:33 AM.
    "Is there anyone on this ship, who even remotely, looks like Satan?" -- James Kirk, U.S.S. Enterprise.

  6. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by Cobalt60 View Post
    here's another example. with my son, I protected him from dogs. more specifically, the neighbor's dog.
    (it was totally untrained and jumped all over people trying to hump their legs).
    every time that little beast was around, I scooped my baby up to avoid the confrontation.

    ^ this evolved to a point where, as a toddler, if my kid saw a dog at the park (any dog) he would immediately reach to be picked up.
    he became nervous and agitated if he saw a dog, even a hundred feet away.

    ^^ this evolved to a point where, even now as a full-grown 26 year old, he has an irrational fear of dogs. (oops, my bad).



    a good way to avoid this would have been, to introduce the kid to dogs at an early age, and make sure he had some good experiences.
    (like "building an immune system"). this would teach him that there's nothing to fear.

    but instead... he learned to fear all dogs, BECAUSE I foolishly went out of my way, to 'protect' him from puppies. this phobia could have been avoided.

    Not necessarily. You're assigning an exclusivity to something that may have numerous origin points and placing a bulk of blame upon your actions. There are plenty of people who have cynophobia, that were never "taught" it by a parent or an elder. They picked it up themselves.

    There are people that have ailurophobia - the irrational fear of cats - and few people, if any, teach children to be afraid of cats.

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