Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Blister Bubbles Detaching or Decomposing Naturally in the Next 50 Years?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by The_Antiquarian View Post
    I have been only collecting AFA graded Kenner figures that comewith full blister and etc.
    Although I have been absent from the hobby, my interest incollecting these beauties have peaked again after watching Solo!
    Upon perusing eBay listing, I thought about making bid for “high-end”AFA graded items, but one question has been perplexing me for a week or so andhad kept me away from clicking the “bid” button.
    From my previous reading at rebelscum, many have dissuadedothers from collecting AFA graded 12 back because the likelihood of blistersfalling off/deteriorating is too great of a risk.
    When I collect things, I am in for a long run. Although I donot ever sell my collection (with exception to one artwork painting before, dueto condition issue), I find great joy in seeing the value of my collectionremaining stable/rise. I would be heartbroken to see my AFA 85+ Darth Vader 12 Backwith full blister, diminish in value when I realize that the blister hasliterally deterioriated away or fall off from the cardboard in the next 50years or so.
    What would be you guys’ input?
    Eventually all blisters are going to separate from cardbacks. The glues just simply break down over the years due to the factors we already know, temperature, humidity, light, etc. Some will probably be attached in 50 years I'm sure, but many will fall off. Very few collectors have the time and money to keep their collections in a climate controlled setting. If you could store them the same way as the Declaration of Independence with sensors and 24/7 monitoring then the blisters have a chance of lasting several hundred more years. HAHAHA.

    It really boils down to two things. Are you a collector that is in the hobby for a long term investment or are you a collector that does it for the love of Star Wars and preserving that culture? You can be both, but each collector's mindset tends to lean heavier in one direction or the other depending on what stage of collecting they are in. For those in the long term investment phase of collecting, having your investment physically degrade over time is something those collectors should strongly keep in the forefront of their minds. Which ever type of collector you are it is your choice or responsibility (which ever you choose) to preserve your collection for future generations to enjoy, whether they end up caring about Star Wars or not. I'm going to fall back on an old saying and say, sometimes its better to have something and not need it, than to need something and not have it. Nobody knows what the future will hold and anyone who tries to predict it is a bigger fool, but I'll stay strong in my hope that future generations will still hold some bit of interest.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by WampasGottaEat2 View Post
    Eventually all blisters are going to separate from cardbacks. The glues just simply break down over the years due to the factors we already know, temperature, humidity, light, etc. Some will probably be attached in 50 years I'm sure, but many will fall off. Very few collectors have the time and money to keep their collections in a climate controlled setting. If you could store them the same way as the Declaration of Independence with sensors and 24/7 monitoring then the blisters have a chance of lasting several hundred more years. HAHAHA.

    It really boils down to two things. Are you a collector that is in the hobby for a long term investment or are you a collector that does it for the love of Star Wars and preserving that culture? You can be both, but each collector's mindset tends to lean heavier in one direction or the other depending on what stage of collecting they are in. For those in the long term investment phase of collecting, having your investment physically degrade over time is something those collectors should strongly keep in the forefront of their minds. Which ever type of collector you are it is your choice or responsibility (which ever you choose) to preserve your collection for future generations to enjoy, whether they end up caring about Star Wars or not. I'm going to fall back on an old saying and say, sometimes its better to have something and not need it, than to need something and not have it. Nobody knows what the future will hold and anyone who tries to predict it is a bigger fool, but I'll stay strong in my hope that future generations will still hold some bit of interest.
    I agree 100% regarding all blisters eventually separating from their card backs. There is no real way to stop it. It is unfortunate, as I am sure all of us want to preserve something from that era, the nostalgia. On the flip side, I dont think most future generations are really interested in owning these vintage toys and will not relate to them so I think in time SW vintage toy collecting will be a very incredible narrow niche.

  3. #13
    Lieutenant Commander Mike_Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    United States

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthieu View Post
    No you’re not one of the next generations I’m talking about. I have a younger sister your age and she is from the same generation as me. Our kids are the next generation I’m talking about. I have 4 boys, age 11, 14, 17 and 18. They are all Star Wars fans, they even have their own Star Wars collections with modern items and vintage items as well. But I clearly anticipate that none of them will collect vintage SW as I do when they are grown up adults.
    This is only my opinion, I know, but I don’t see how our collections and more generally the vintage SW market will survive us in 20 or 25 years.
    Understood and well said. It is tough to garner interest as a young person, especially when the hobby is cost prohibitive. I think some forms of collecting might be a coming of age type of scenario. Hopefully your kids end-up following in your footsteps.

    I do think the Disney acquisition helped cement vintage relevance. There's no question Disney will continue to pump out content for future generations, and as long as Star Wars is relevant, there will always be a place in the hobby for the "originals." My humble opinion.

    Quote Originally Posted by WampasGottaEat2 View Post
    The glues just simply break down over the years due to the factors we already know, temperature, humidity, light, etc.
    Vintage blisters aren't held together by glue.

  4. #14
    [QUOTE=
    Vintage blisters aren't held together by glue.[/QUOTE]




    Sorry, I meant magic. They are held together by magic
    Last edited by WampasGottaEat2; 10-17-2018 at 01:05 PM.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Hoth_My_Fav View Post
    I agree 100% regarding all blisters eventually separating from their card backs. There is no real way to stop it. It is unfortunate, as I am sure all of us want to preserve something from that era, the nostalgia. On the flip side, I dont think most future generations are really interested in owning these vintage toys and will not relate to them so I think in time SW vintage toy collecting will be a very incredible narrow niche.
    I fully agree, sadly...

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike_Z View Post
    Understood and well said. It is tough to garner interest as a young person, especially when the hobby is cost prohibitive. I think some forms of collecting might be a coming of age type of scenario. Hopefully your kids end-up following in your footsteps.

    I do think the Disney acquisition helped cement vintage relevance. There's no question Disney will continue to pump out content for future generations, and as long as Star Wars is relevant, there will always be a place in the hobby for the "originals." My humble opinion.
    Hopefully you’re right.
    What I can see though is that growing up the kids want to have their own stuff, something different from their parents’, so they feel they achieve something on their own and build their own personality. When I was a kid I loved the stuff that my dad used to collect and which was connected to his own childhood, but growing up I realized I needed to entertain my own passion, something which would make me different from my dad. I followed in his footsteps in that I have become a collector like him, but collecting something else .
    Today’s kids are into virtual stuff, video games, electronic devices (and very expansive sneakers!!) ... There is so much larger a technological gap between us and the kids than between us and our parents, I really wonder how their world will look like when they are grown up adults!

  7. #17
    Lieutenant Commander Mike_Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    United States

    Quote Originally Posted by WampasGottaEat2 View Post
    Sorry, I meant magic. They are held together by magic
    http://www.blisternews.com/2009/07/h...onded-to-card/

  8. #18
    Yeah I know they're heat sealed. Heat melted plastic breaks down the same way that glues do over time is what I was getting at. I still think the magic sealed blister concept is pretty funny. Cool link though, I've not seen that one

  9. #19
    Lieutenant Commander Mike_Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    United States

    Quote Originally Posted by WampasGottaEat2 View Post
    Yeah I know they're heat sealed. Heat melted plastic breaks down the same way that glues do over time is what I was getting at. I still think the magic sealed blister concept is pretty funny. Cool link though, I've not seen that one


    The good news is our bodies should degrade faster than the heat-seals.

  10. #20
    In average the bond strength of solvent based coatings is better that the strength of water based coatings, but if all the guidelines for the use and processing are being respected, both types of coatings give good sealing results.

    The coating on the board responds to the heat and the plastic of the bubble to form a bond so while maybe no separate glue is used, the board coating itself creates some sort of adhesive bond which can break down over time just like any other adhered surface, glued or otherwise

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •