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Thread: My Jabba’s Throne Room diorama (under construction)

  1. #11
    Looking great so far. A Jabba Throne room is a build I want to try when I get the time so watching your build will give me some ideas. Certain kinds of foam are readily sandable with ordinary sandpaper. I see people cutting foams with some sort of hot wire tool that allows nice smooth cuts and the ability to round edges and achieve other curved cutting.

  2. #12
    Yes! I know about the wire-cutting tools. And that they can be pretty pricey. I’m willing to live with some rough and uneven edges for now. And if I really catch the bug, I’d entertain the idea. But thanks! Hey, if you go and look at some great — and I mean jaw-dropping great — dioramas, like this https://forum.rebelscum.com/showthread.php?t=1083215 — you’ll think, there’s no way I can compete with this!

    And you’re right! But that’s not a bad a thing. Some people are better than others at this, and JabbaPalaceSpy aka Doug, is one of them. And this one by Jess —https://forum.rebelscum.com/showthre...=Jabba+diorama — is fantastic.

    So, use them for inspiration as I did, and don’t rush! You won’t get it done in a day, or a week. Or a month. And ask questions to make yourself better. That’s what I’m trying to do and will continue to do so.

  3. #13
    Grand Admiral Utinniii's Avatar
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    I use both stlyes of wire cutters (soldering iron and straight wire). They are actually pretty simple to make and there are tutorials about how to make them. (I haven't made one but I intend to make a wire one that is fixed on a board so it will give a 90 degree angle. Both have specific uses.
    If you have a soldering iron and don't need fine details, it will work. The foam is toxic though so do it outside.

    You can also find much thinner foam (pink, not blue). It is easier to cut.

  4. #14
    I apologize for how these photos might be processed (I.e., they might appear upside down) but I don’t think it matters much because of the angle at which I took them. Here is the Jabba Throne room frame I created over the course of six days. It is not to exact scale and likely (more than likely) uneven in places. So be it, Jedi. Considering I have the artistic and architectural inclinations of a potato bug, I am beyond pleased with my effort! I think this thing will look great once painted. Now, the trophy room still needs a Han hung in a soon-to-be-created box that will be placed on a wall next to a Taun Taun head and the head of some other unfortunate creature.

    So, my question for you pros:
    1. For a first-time effort for any diorama construction in 42 years of life, how’s it look?
    2. Painting — and Utinniii I’m talking to you because you wrote about it the other day — what paints should I buy? Literally, does spray painting work? Or, is some kind of mixture more appropriate? If so, what kind, where should I buy it, and what type of brush do I use?

    i really do need a crash course in this. So any advice regarding how to cast shadows or to give it a lived-in look, I am all ears! Thanks!

    Last edited by dzodge; 09-06-2018 at 07:22 PM.

  5. #15
    Grand Admiral Utinniii's Avatar
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    Potato bugs are kind cute! You should put one in your dio.

    You should be really impressed with what you did. It is amazing for a first time effort.

    With regards to paint, I'd use acrylic. Spray paint dissolves foam so it would be a bad choice.

    Make the extra effort and use plaster on the walls. Just paint will make it look flat.
    Look how flat the terrain looks here.


    If you look st the bottom of this pic, you can see how just paint looks, and all the brush lines. However, look how rich the walls look and how much character the walls have. You can see all the different coats of paint on it because of the texture.


    I used grout here for even more texture.



    I added paint (dollar tree) to it until I got the color I wanted. Then I gave it several different (darker) washes, with some dry brushing of different areas in different lighter colors. I added mold, oil stains and it looks pretty real. My nephew thought my prison doors diorama actually got moldy, but it was just the paint.

    Last edited by Utinniii; 09-06-2018 at 10:01 PM.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by dzodge View Post
    I apologize for how these photos might be processed (I.e., they might appear upside down) but I don’t think it matters much because of the angle at which I took them. Here is the Jabba Throne room frame I created over the course of six days. It is not to exact scale and likely (more than likely) uneven in places. So be it, Jedi. Considering I have the artistic and architectural inclinations of a potato bug, I am beyond pleased with my effort! I think this thing will look great once painted. Now, the trophy room still needs a Han hung in a soon-to-be-created box that will be placed on a wall next to a Taun Taun head and the head of some other unfortunate creature.

    So, my question for you pros:
    1. For a first-time effort for any diorama construction in 42 years of life, how’s it look?
    2. Painting — and Utinniii I’m talking to you because you wrote about it the other day — what paints should I buy? Literally, does spray painting work? Or, is some kind of mixture more appropriate? If so, what kind, where should I buy it, and what type of brush do I use?

    i really do need a crash course in this. So any advice regarding how to cast shadows or to give it a lived-in look, I am all ears! Thanks!

    dzodge, first time or not, looks great - don't stop!

    A couple things I would add, though they might have been touched on:

    Always plan ahead! Applies to every part of the process, but with painting, always be aware of what needs to be painted before being affixed to the final structure, as it's hard to paint things when they're all closed in already and whatnot. So keep it flexible and able to be disassembled until the final gluing, after everything is painted.

    Learn to dry-brush and wash. These are great techniques for adding texture and bring out details in your work, respectively. For the walls, stucco or something like Utinniii said, then after the painting (or if it's already mixed in) apply a wash that's just a few shades darker than the base color, then a dry-brush a few shades lighter over the top, and it will pop! Also use flat colors for most surfaces, unless, of course, you intend for them to shine.

    For shadows, other than clever blackwashes in certain places, the best thing for creating shadows, of course, is light! Adding a few small lights in key locations will do wonders in that regard.

    I'm not as experienced as Utinniii but those are a few things that came to mind.

    Good luck and can't wait to see more!
    Last edited by Darth_Sceptaurus; 09-07-2018 at 05:03 PM.

  7. #17
    Thank you all. OK, when I go to Lowe’s tonight, I can pick up a square of brown stucco.
    What do I use to apply it? A common trowel? I realize these questions might sound basic, but I want to make sure I’m getting the correct tools.

    I can buy a basic painting brush. It sounds like you’re recommending i get paint fro Dollar Tree or Michaels, and I can do that. Just making sure it’s acrylic.

    I also can buy smaller brushes for the little nooks etc.

    So:
    1. Stucco the walls (and floor) first?
    2 Apply acrylic paint.
    3. Apply a wash (meaning watered down black pain that will fill the little crevices to help shadow?)

    Thanks for your help everyone!

  8. #18
    Michael's is great for acrylic paint. It's like 1 or 2 dollars a bottle, vs. places like hobbytown where you can easily pay $10. For brushes, I read that ones made with real hair vs. synthetic are much better, as they don't leave as many lines. But if you won't be covering a large area with a brush alone, this probably isn't a concern.

    For the wash, for instance if the color of your base wall is tan, you might try mixing a little dark brown with the tan and trying that for the wash, before you go with black. You can always do more coats later if you want it darker. On my model Death Star I used like 3 coats before I liked the result. I went with black since grey was the base color, but I wanted the details to be black anyway. That wouldn't work for everything.

    For a trowel, just a small plastic one should be good.

    Since you are using foam as a base material, I don't know how well the stucco will adhere to it, as I've never worked with it before. You may need a coat of something under the stucco before you apply it, though someone like Utinniii would know much better about that than me.

  9. #19
    Here’s a quick question. Would spackle be the best choice for the floor, stairs AND walls.
    I can smooth it onto the floor and make it look textured with a foam sponge by applying spackle and then dabbing it with a foam sponge. Then after it dries, I’d begin painting. Right?

  10. #20
    I mean if you can get the texture you want with it, I don't see why not. People put it on their houses, so it should be good enough for a dio!

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